The Fat Lady Sang

Few Hollywood insiders can boast as rich a career as Robert Evans, and as much willingness to share all the glossy, gory details.  His second volume of memoirs concentrates on the series of three strokes that played so great a part in his recent years.

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Bleed Through: New and Selected Poems

Academic and prosaic themes; language and unvoiced feelings—all blend inextricably and beautifully in the poems of Michael Davidson, which, by deconstructing themselves, make the practice of poetry fresh again.

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The New York Nobody Knows

In the genre of "books tallying mammoth heroic self-imposed feats" comes William B. Helmreich's engaging account of how he logged 6,000 miles on foot through all the boroughs of NYC, accumulating many insights into the eternal, multi-ethnic metropolis.

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White Girls

The long-awaited unclassifiable collection of short pieces by Hilton Als finds the essayist riffing on a vast array of cultural tropes, all subsumed under his chosen title that even includes Truman Capote and Michael Jackson.

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Life after Life

Containing what our own James Parker called "the thin-air atmosphere of an artistic high", Kate Atkinson's emotionally taut  thriller of Ursula Todd - a woman whose birth and rebirth change history - has been named one of Barnes and Noble's Best New Fiction Books of 2013.

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Days of Fire

Peter Baker's candid and revealing endeavor into the political strategies and internal conflicts of the Bush-Cheney administration is one of the year's most talked-about histories, and one of Barnes and Noble's Best New Nonfiction Books of 2013.

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Blinding: Volume 1

This ambitious bildungsroman by Romanian author Mircea Cărtărescu focuses on a teenager and the magical-realist milieu through which he strives to grow into an untarnished adulthood.

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An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth

The number of humans who have been into space is vanishingly small, but Col. Chris Hadfield has managed to crystallize his orbital experiences into a text of inspirational gleanings as vivid as Saturn's rings.

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Gilgi

With its first presentation in English, Irmgard Keun's revolutionary and audacious 1931 novel about a little shopgirl who dared should now find the wider audience it fully deserves.

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Thank You for Your Service

Embedding himself into the lives of demobbed soldiers and their families, David Finkel manages to convey all the excruciating trials and tribulations, glories and gratitudes of the modern military.

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How the Light Gets In

A Barnes & Noble Best New Fiction Book of 2013: Quebec sleuth Armand Gamache ventures to a secluded village over Christmas to decipher how one of the world's most famous people in Earth has disappeared, and why only a crazed local poet knows how to find her.

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Empress Dowager Cixi

A Barnes & Noble Best New Non-Fiction Book of 2013: The motives, passions, and intimate diaries of the most important woman in Chinese history are revealed in this stirring biography of rebellion, antiquity's arrival at modernity, and international love and war.

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The Kraus Project

This newly translated work of a forgotten and high-minded European intellectual garnered advance publicity aplenty, thanks to the involvement by literary light Jonathan Franzen, who finds in Karl Kraus's work the template of our own disaffected age.

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The Isle of Youth: Stories

The second short-story collection from Laura van den Berg delivers seven immaculately crafted tales concerning a welter of unusual women and the notably relatable lives they lead.

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Fosse

A mammoth portrait of a pop culture icon, Fosse warmly profiles the legendary Oscar, Emmy and Tony-Award winner.

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Fiddlehead

Cherie Priest's unique brand of steampunk involves feisty heroines, eccentric villains and robust anti-heroes, all elaborately cavorting in a brilliantly realized alternate-history version of Civil-War-era America.

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Americana: The Kinks, the Riff, the Road: The Story

Ray Davies, the musical genius behind "Lola," "Victoria," "Waterloo Sunset" and scores of other immortal tunes now tells all, sharing with fascinated fans the successes and disappointments, scandals and artistic pinnacles of a career that stretches from 1964 to a rumored Kinks reunion today.

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The Men Who United the States

Simon Winchester (The Professor and the Madman) chronicles singular individuals ("Explorers, Inventors, Eccentrics and Mavericks") whose stubborn genius lashed a nascent nation together into a powerful and glorious whole.

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Empress of Fashion: A Life of Diana Vreeland

Do today's fashion figures fail to loom as mythically as those of yore?   Amanda Mackenzie Stuart celebrates the life and career of an iconic giants of yesteryear with empathy and panache.

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S.

Doug Dorst (The Surf Guru) brings to life a unique mystery from the imagination of co-author (and director of the upcoming Star Wars sequels) J. J. Abrams: a novel designed to look like a library book filled with news reports, postcards, and two lovers' mash notes.

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The Map and the Territory

Economic and behavioral insights from Alan Greenspan, the man often tasked with drafting Wall Street's commandments.  Practical observations into the ways of the marketplace complement neatly explained abstruse theories.

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Candy: A Century of Panic and Pleasure

Samara Kawash's food history is more than a sweet indulgence: this deep inquiry into the industry of sugary snacks proves a satisfying delight and sharp-toothed study of confection's history and science.

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Hitler's Furies: German Women in the Nazi Killing Fields

Wendy Lower's grimly hypnotic study of Nazi fervor among German women during and before WWII, and their role in the dark descent toward the Party's "Final Solution".

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The Dream Maker

Jean-Christophe Rufin's novel brings to vivid life the exemplary career of a little known medieval paragon:  Jacques Coeur, banker, visionary and crafter of the glory that was France.

 

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Orr: My Story

Even folks who don't follow hockey know the name of Bobby Orr, in his quiet retirement given to inspiring philanthropy.  This long-awaited autobiography conveys the legend's achievements on and off the ice with humble wit.

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The Skin

Curzio Malaparte's 1943 magically naturalistic novel charts the shifting fates of wartime Italy in a trenchant, hard-hitting fashion that balances the play of larger forces against affairs of the human heart.

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Perv: The Sexual Deviant in All of Us

Fearless sex writer Jesse Bering argues that all of us have some kind of paraphilia (intense erotic attraction to atypical fodder) - and should embrace it, via the teachings of Freud and Kinsey, and the shapely curves of the Eiffel Tower.

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The Death of Santini

Few autobiographical novels have accrued as loyal and enthusiastic a following as Conroy's The Great Santini.  This follow-up memoir strips away the pseudonyms and recounts the full and final saga of the writer and his autocratic father.

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Falling Upwards

No method of human flight is more entrancing than ballooning, and the earliest days of the pastime are brought to cinematic life by popular historian Richard Holmes, who find a circus of colorful characters to enliven his pages.

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Solo: A James Bond Novel

Literary giant William Boyd's tale is a crackerjack spy story of Agent 007, and a rebel movement in the fictional African land of Zanzarim during the Golden Age of the 1960s.

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April 19: "What you see first, after the starting gun's crack, is a column of bobbing runners, thousands of them, surging downhill..."

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

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