By Blood We Live

Fans of Glen Duncan's previous two books in this engagingly violence-and-sex-packed series—The Last Werewolf; Talulla Rising—are in for a rousing conclusion to the trilogy, as werewolf Talulla and vampire Remshi aim to reconcile millennia of hostilities.

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What's Important is Feeling

Adam Wilson's fierce tales of botched dreams, conflicted ambitions and naïve missteps make for a millennial Winesburg, Ohio,  capturing all the idealism and cynicism of young cohorts facing tough realities.

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Russians: The People Behind the Power

Gregory Feifer's decade as a Moscow reporter offers sharp insights on everything from Vladimir Putin, Edward Snowden, and a nation's sexual politics, to the enduring pleasures of Dosteyevsky, good vodka, and discovering one's familial roots.

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The Guest Cat

Popular Japanese poet Takashi Hiraide's charming fable depicts the enigmatic ways by which a mysteriously wise cat remakes the stultified existence of a moribund husband and wife who have lost all joy in each other.

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Inside a Pearl

Edmund White's recollections of his Paris years is a madeleine's worth of rich memories, as the author shares his vivid experiences discovering his sexuality, favorite writers, and flaneur's walks through the City of Light.

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The Sun and Other Stars

Brigid Pasulka unfolds young Etto's grief and redemption in the small Italian Riviera town of San Benedetto, where he finds an unlikely path back to joy in the company of Ukrainian soccer star Yuri Fil and his alluring sister.

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Louis Armstrong: Master of Modernism

Satchmo's iconic voice and evocative horn sing out in Thomas Brothers's trenchant study of Armstrong's shift from New Orleans sideman to worldwide sensation, while race, food, and romance form the rhythm.

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Thirty Girls

Susan Minot weaves the plight of a passel of teenage Ugandans captured by a guerilla group with the experiences of a Western journalist, offering a multivalent take on chaos and cruelty in a tumultuous country.

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More Than Conquerers

Megan Hustad's childhood as a missionary in the Caribbean and Amsterdam emerges as a staggering vision of televangelists, the allure of New York City, and one woman's wrestling with religion and her sense of purpose.

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The Improbability Principle

David J. Hand argues that we each experience roughly one miracle a month, but that each can be viewed through explanable rationality.  This bold new look at rare moments challenges the very notions of luck and coincidence.

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My Life in Middlemarch

One pivotal book can contour a whole life, if encountered at just the right moment.  So it was for Mead and Middlemarch.  Her triumph here is to make the reader care about George Eliot's masterpiece as much as Mead does, and recognize the broader implications of all such literary polestars.

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After I'm Gone

Baltimore gambling boss Felix Brewer vanished ten years ago, leaving behind both illegal business and respectable family.  Now his ex-girlfriend is found dead.  Is Felix back?  And why? Cold cases warm up under Laura Lippman's expert hand, and this one's no exception.

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The Sixth Extinction

65 million years ago, an asteroid impact brought a sudden end to the age of the dinosaurs.  In this riveting scientific detective story, New Yorker writer Elizabeth Kolbert follows the equally dramatic wave of biological destruction happening right under our noses.

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Extreme Medicine

Dr. Kevin Fong charts the symbiotic relation between curative science and daredevil explorers, as today's doctors invent new techniques to heal the wounds of every ailing Indiana Jones.

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Strange Bodies

A poor Samuel Johnson scholar sits wrongly imprisoned, the victim of a Silicon Valley conspiracy.  Even worse, he's been dead for months.  Marcel Theroux's surrealist ghost story ably echoes the works of Julio Cortazar and Stephen King.

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The Race Underground

Two engineers - one of Boston, one of New York - develop a fierce rivalry to build the first subway system in Doug Most's whip-smart true story of innovation in the 1880s.

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The Parallel Apartments

A pregnant Texas woman's odyssey to New York includes encounters with serial killers, opera singers, and a collision course with her family secrets.

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The UnAmericans

Molly Antopol's much-anticipated debut collects stories of estranged families from California to Belarus - each a compassionate portrait of political ideology's impact upon love's binding ties.  A Discover Great New Writers selection.

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Down to the Crossroads

Aram Goudsouzian's portrait of James Meredith (the first African American student at the University of Mississippi) and his 1966 "March Against Fear" is a stark look at the menace of racial unrest, and the forging of the Black Power movement.

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Caught

Lisa Moore's crackerjack heist thriller doubles as a winning character study of a self-assured drug runner,  on the lam and seeking escape from Columbia to Canada.

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The Flight of the Silvers

Spared from Earth's end, six humans are brought to an alternate timeline by suspicious immortals in Daniel Price's supernatural thriller, combining the best of Marvel Comics and the films of J.J Abrams.

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Piano Stories

Dubbed "a writer like no other" in Italo Calvino's introduction to this newly reissued short story collection, Felisberto Hernandez here emerges as an underappreciated master of magical realism in the tradition of Cortazar and Marquez.

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Windfall

The possibility of global warming presents an ominous view of future generations.  But as McKenzie Funk's startling study reports, some of the world's biggest corporations have plans for turning impending climate change into record profits.

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Call Me Burroughs

Beat Generation historian Barry Miles issues his definitive biography of William Burroughs: fabulist, banned author, profane poet, painter, gay icon, musician, violent soul, loyal ally, and groundbreaking writer.

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Still Life with Bread Crumbs

When a once-famed photographer heads for the hills into country life, she literally finds love among the trees, with a roofer able to expand the lens of her worldview.  A shining portrait of unexpected romance from Anna Quindlen (One True Thing).

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Resurrection

Wolf Haas has forged one of modern noir's best detective series in the adventures of Inspector Simon Brenner.  Readers can now relish tracing back to Brenner's first big case: the suspicious death of two Americans atop an Alpine Village ski mountain. 

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The Double Life of Paul de Man

One of the renowned literary theorists of his time, Paul de Man's legacy was destroyed by revelations of his alligence to the Nazi Party.  Evelyn Barish deconstructs the deconstructionist, in this riveting story of a major philosopher's dark duplicity.

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Boy in the Twilight

In thirteen stories of China's closed quarters and shadowy paths, the joys and hardships of rural migrant life are captured in Yu Hua's keen eye and compassion.

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Night Watch

Like a mutant hybrid of Ian Fleming's taut spy games and the supernatural worlds of Neil Gaiman (with some Russian Futurists thrown in for good measure), Sergei Lukyaneko's faceoff between vampires and the magical task force that polices them is one thrilling bite to the neck.

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The Ballad of Barnabas Pierkiel

A neurotic's love story, set in the fictional nation of Scalvusia in 1939.  Magdalena Zyzak creates an unforgettable antihero in Barnabas, an innocent farmer lusting after the gypsy concubine who enchants his doomed village.

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April 21: " 'Pull' includes 'invitations to tea' at which one hears smiling reminders that a better life is available to people who stop talking about massacres..."

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

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