Displaying articles for: July 2010

Eating for Beginners

BNR contributor Melanie Rehak delves into the kitchen of a Brooklyn restaurant for a year-long discovery of the choices and compromises involved in putting food on the table, and in our mouths. Her finicky toddler adds some delightful detours on her learning curve. Read more...

Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg: The Letters

This first published collection of correspondence between the two leading lights of the Beat Generation illuminates the inspirations of the legendary authors of On the Road and Howl, tracing their fortunes and friendship from 1944 until Kerouac's death in 1969. Read more...

Murder in the High Himalaya

Casting the undeniable tragedy of a Tibetan nun's thwarted escape from Communist rule as a symbol of the oppression of an entire nation, journalist Jonathan Green depicts the ethical and realpolitik frigidity that mirrors the harsh physical conditions at the Roof of the World. Read more...

Faithful Place

An excellent new Dublin-set psychological thriller from Tana French, bestselling author of In the Woods and The Likeness. Read more...

The Six-Cornered Snowflake

A delightfully ingenious scientific, literary, and philosophical meditation on the most majestic and ephemeral of natural wonders, by the great 17th-century astronomer Johannes Kepler. Read more...

The Vera Wright Trilogy

Well-regarded Australian author Elizabeth Jolley died in 2007, just missing a planned revival of her fiction. An omnibus of three autobiographical novels, this volume forms the perfect introduction to her unduly neglected work. Read more...

One Day

A sensation in England, David Nicholls's inventive and romantic novel depicts twenty years in the relationship of Dexter Mayhew and Emma Morley one day at a time—and it's always July 15. Charming. Read more...

How Pleasure Works

Is there a unifying engine of desire behind the variegated affections of humanity? Yale psychologist Paul Bloom attempts to parse the hidden mechanisms underlying our preferences, be they sexual, musical, or literary. Read more...

What's Your Sound, Hound the Hound?

Mo Willems can claim the title of this generation’s Dr. Suess. With a keen sense of the absurd, he has the rare ability to create interesting stories and characters from the limited list of words for emergent readers. 4+ Read more...

Go Mutants

Grease meets Invaders from Mars in this second novel from Larry Doyle, author of I Love You, Beth Cooper. Doyle's experience as a writer for The Simpsons promises surreal satire and parody more potent than a Kang and Kodos death ray. Read more...

The Book of Mr. Natural

R. Crumb's Mr. Natural is precisely forty-three years old this year?!? Never! The saucy sage is simultaneously forever young and forever ancient. For all those who found Crumb's Genesis a tad too tame, these outlandish American Zen tall tales will enlighteningly knock their socks off. Read more...

Intellectual Life and the American South

Few historians writing today are able to marshal, as Michael O'Brien can, formidable literary gifts to complement their scholarly acumen. The author of the recent Mrs. Adams in Winter, O'Brien here offers a welcome abridgment of his two-volume, Bancroft Prize-winning Conjectures of Order, an illuminating exploration of the intellectual and cultural life of the Old South. Read more...

Pearl Buck in China

Celebrated biographer Hilary Spurling portrays the life and times of Pearl Buck, the Nobel Prize-winning American novelist (The Good Earth) whose popular fiction of the 1930s and 40s revealed the long-hidden world of China to Western eyes. Read more...

The Quickening Maze

The widely praised young British poet and novelist Adam Foulds's expressive prose gives an urgent and lyrical sense of enchantment to this fiction based on poet John Clare's 1830s incarceration in a mental institution. Read more...

Scoundrels in Law

The most notorious law firm of the 19th century's Gilded Age is given its due in Cait Murphy's exuberant account of William Howe and Abraham Hummel, whose roster of clients in post-Civil War New York included corrupt politicians, Broadway stars, bank robbers, socialites, and gangsters. Read more...

Jasmine

Love songs steeped in loveliness by two jazz luminaries, Keith Jarret and Charlie Haden. The relaxed affinty of pianist and bassist elicits emotional eloquence from such standards as "For All We Know," "Goodbye," and "Body and Soul." Read more...

Bonhoeffer

A Lutheran pastor, Dietrich Bonhoeffer was a trenchant modern theologian, as his books—Ethics and The Cost of Discipleship, to name two—amply testify. Eric Metaxas's meticulously researched biography reveals that he was also a figure of extraordinary moral courage in Nazi Germany. A riveting story of historical and spiritiual import. Read more...

Chef

Jaspreet Singh's tale of a former military chef who returns to Kashmir to cook a wedding meal for a general's daughter—and make peace with his past—is the the most mesmerizing novel I've read this spring (it also has the loveliest cover). Read more...

Cardturner

The Newbery Award-winning Louis Sachar (Holes) outdoes himself in this story about a young boy and his rich, card-playing great-uncle. An intergenerational story of dry humor, deep respect, and true love. 12+ Read more...

Hollywood Hellraisers

Ever since rich Tinseltown dirt was spilled in Kenneth Anger's Hollywood Babylon, a cottage industry has arisen that reveals the titillating truth behind the studio publicists' myths. Having focused on an earlier generation of bad boys in Hellraisers, Robert Sellers now turns to younger icons of outrageous behavior. Read more...

Lost Rights

Combining elements from mystery, thriller, and conspiracy novels into a quest fit for Indiana Jones, David Howard's true tale of the perilous peregrinations of one of the original copies of the Bill of Rights proves that history is stranger than fiction. Read more...

July 28: Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin eloped on this day in 1814.

Crime fiction legends Dennis Lehane and Michael Connelly discuss the new book that unites their beloved sleuths Patrick Kenzie and Harry Bosch.

advertisement