Displaying articles for: May 2010

The Prince of Mist

In this tale by the internationally bestelling author of Shadow of the Wind, the Fleischmann family is relocated to the Spanish Coast during World War II. The brother and sister teens, Alicia and Max, make friends with a local boy and soon find themselves caught up in a suspenseful story of supernatural horror. Originally published in 1993, this is the first English translation. Age 12 and up. Read more...

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Does mathematics underlie the structure of the universe—or only humanity's perceptions? Author Miller, who previously examined links between Einstein and Picasso, explores the interface between physics and psychology in the persons of unlikely pals Wolfgang Pauli and Carl Jung. Read more...

I Hotel

An ambitious, multivalent fiction—its prose charts a course which leads the story through graphic art, playwriting, and philosophy—that begins in 1968 and captures a decade of political passions and ideological conflict as reflected in the experiences of an extraordinary cast of characters in San Francisco's Chinatown. If you're wondering at the future the past and present of the novel are pointing toward, look here. Read more...

Operation Mincemeat—Aloud

Ben Macintyre’s Operation Mincemeat details Britain’s most ingenious hour: a plan conceived by James Bond creator Ian Fleming to set a body adrift, kitted out as a British officer and carrying false plans for the invasion of southern Europe, to mislead the Nazis. It’s all true, and it worked—as Katherine A. Powers reports in her review of a “terrific book written with intelligence and brio." We're adding it here to bring your attention to the audiobook version, read with characteristic excellence by the fabulous John Lee. Read more...

Nobody

Who made the mess in the kitchen? Nobody. That's the name of George's imaginary friend, whose happily shadowy presence animates this sweet depiction of a family shocked by George's, um, ingenuity in the kitchen while his parents sleep. Liz Rosenberg's freshly told, brightly illustrated (by Julie Downing) tale for youngsters and their parents. Age 5 and up. Read more...

Sinatra Jobim Complete Reprise Recordings

The original 1967 collaboration between Frank Sinatra and Antonio Carlos Jobim, the Brazilian musician whose compositions were the best international ambassadors of bossanova, is quite simply one of the most beautiful realizations of popular music you'll ever come upon. In Rio slang "bossa" means "shrewdness," and Sinatra, recognizing no doubt that the new shrewdness, in its gentle, intimate undulations of sound and sense, gave fresh life to the old one, of which he was past master, tums in the most concentrated performances of his later career. This welcome reissue includes ten tracks from a less well-known session recorded two years later, with arrangements by Eumir Deodato; it's not quite as good as the first set, but then almost nothing is. Read more...

Hub Fans Bid Kid Adieu

John Updike's legendary and affectionate farewell to Ted Williams, the greatest of the Boston Red Sox, is here given a luxe and loving reissue by the Library of America. Read more...

Art + Science Now

An international survey of how scientific research and technological innovation are informing the aesthetics of the 21st century, from algorithms and kinetics to robotics and microbiology; illustrated with the work of scores of contemporary artists. Read more...

A Question of Belief

Leon's nineteenth Commissario Guido Brunetti novel finds the ruminative inspector solving another Venetian murder in the company of his regular colleagues, his Henry James loving wife, and the preternaturally resourceful Signorina Elettra. Read more...

Why Translation Matters

The acclaimed translator of Don Quixote, García Márquez, and Vargas Llosa defends the importance of the apprehension and comprehension her vocation fosters. Read more...

52 Loaves

The author of The $64 Tomato humorously and thoughtfully kneads his obsessive quest for the perfect crust, a mission that leads him, and the reader, to a baking school in Paris, a monastery in Normandy, and the New York State Fair.

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Deep Creek

A historical thriller set in the Idaho Territory in 1887, this riveting tale was inspired by a massacre of Chinese gold miners and the pursuit of their killers by a small-town judge. Read more...

Sex

Mark Doty unforgettably remembers his early marriage and the awakening sexuality of the affair it engendered; Jeanette Winterson concocts a wickedly irreverent modern myth; James Lord, Robert Bolaño, Tom McCarthy, and Jennifer Egan are among the rest of the contributors to Granta's -- dare I say it -- orgy of good writing on the subject of sex. Read more...

Ideas That Matter

Our resident philosopher presents a valuable and provocative A-to-Z -- from Absolutism to Zeitgeist -- of the concepts that will shape our century. Read more...

No Such Things as Silence: John Cage's 4'33

A composition without any music -- or any composed sound at all -- John Cage's 4'33" is so simple that it resonates with a symphonic array of aesthetic and philosophical issues, as Kyle Gann illustrates in this intriguing book. Read more...

The Unwanted Sound of Everything We Want

One of America's most interrogatory, uncategorizable, and eloquent writers (A Dresser of Sycamore Trees; The Enigma of Anger) explores the ramifications of noise from the street where you live to the other side of the globe. Read more...

July 28: Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin eloped on this day in 1814.

Crime fiction legends Dennis Lehane and Michael Connelly discuss the new book that unites their beloved sleuths Patrick Kenzie and Harry Bosch.

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