Displaying articles for: April 2010

Great Public Squares

From Rome and Venice to Paris and Prague, Spain and Portugal, England and New England, New York and the Northwest, architect Gatje captures the urbane glories of urban public spaces in words, pictures, and computer generated plans.

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Make Way for Tomorrow

Of Leo McCarey's 1937 film, a poignant and profoundly moving story of an elderly couple who must prevail upon the mercy of their children once a bank repossesses their home, Orson Welles said, "It would make a stone cry." Don't miss it. Read more...

Wild Romance

Chloë Schama's debut recounts a compelling tale of exuberant impropriety in Victorian England, and of the independent and unconventional woman -- Theresa Longworth -- at its core. History with a healthy dose of scandal. Read more...

Reporting at Wit’s End

The best essays and articles from a longtime New Yorker writer too long relegated to the shadows cast by A. J. Liebling and Joseph Mitchell, distinguished by vintage portraits of a long-gone NYC. Read more...

The Executor

When a washed-out philosophy doctorate answers a peculiar ad for daily conversation, it kickstarts a strange journey of intellectualism, inheritance battles, and eventually, murder. Read more...

The September Issue

For all those who've wondered, "Just what does Anna Wintour do?," this fascinating documentary of the making of Vogue's September 2007 issue has the answers. Read more...

Tiny Art Director

Based on the popular, eponymous blog, this small and hilariously charming book collects the demanding assignments -- and unequivocal critiques -- toddler Rosie Zeman has directed at her artist father. Marvelous. Read more...

The Bridge

David Remnick’s account of Barack Obama’s life and rise to the Presidency illuminates the ideas and ambitions of “a man nobody sent.” Employing a wealth of revealing interviews, the New Yorker editor delivers insight into how the political crucible of Chicago shaped an idealistic young lawyer into a figure of national transformation. Read more...

The Complete Psalms

Below is an excerpt from Pamela Greenberg's lively new -- and complete -- translation of the Psalms (Psalm 27). It is always surprising to revisit texts we assume we know, and when the text is scripture, the words within words that new translations invoke can be especially refreshing, and at times revelatory. As here.

 

In your tent, I will make my songs into offerings,
singing forth all my melodies to your name.

Listen, God, to my voice when I call out.
With compassion, answer my need.
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The Language God Talks

The 94-year-old novelist (The Caine Mutiny, The Winds of War) uses his friendship with physicist Richard Feynman as a springboard to an explanation of faith, science, and meaning.

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San Patricio

The Chieftains enlist the help of Ry Cooder to explore the legacy of the San Patricios, a band of immigrant soldiers who, in 1846, deserted the American army during the Mexican-American War to fight for the other side. The result is part historical expedition, part cultural inquiry, and -- in its entirety -- a musically ebullient festival of creative imagination. Read more...

April 16: ""Blue pottery vases and bowls for flowers are most attractive, and certain blue books...will repeat and emphasize color."

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

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