Displaying articles for: February 2013

Animal Wise

You've probably heard that dolphins communicate in a rich language of their own and that elephants display emotional bonds.  But Virginia Morrell's engaging new book offers some real surprises from the field of animal intelligence: creative ants, suffering fish, and the astonishing capacity of some bird brains. 

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Nothing Gold Can Stay

Ron Rash's short stories effortlessly shuttle readers through time --  from a Depression-era chain gang to the life of a late-night radio DJ.  But they remain deeply rooted in the  Appalachian mountain world he's captured in novels like The Cove and Serena.

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Fellow Mortals

A carelessly discarded match ignites a raging fire that destroys a neighborhood and changes the victims' lives in this soulful and compassionate debut novel.  A Spring 2013 Discover Great New Writers selection.

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Walkable City

For the first time in human history, the majority of mankind lives in urban environments. A city planner by trade, Jeff Speck has a wealth of ideas about how to make these stone canyons more pleasant, and to bring out a crowded town's natural pedestrian pleasures.

 

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The Age of Edison

We take its effects for granted, but this electrifying account of Thomas Edison’s invention of the modern light bulb, will generate new appreciation for how the conquest of darkness has permanently altered the world. Ernest Freeberg offers a richly detailed study of this transformative moment in human ingenuity.

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Wise Men

Stuart Nadler renders an elegiac portrait of post-WWII Cape Cod,  as which teenager Hilly Wise's budding romance with the niece of his home's caretaker is shattered by his racist father.  An ambitious saga of prejudice, class, and family secrets.

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Fire and Forget

These rousing "Short Stories of the Long War" are uniquely resonant, as fiction penned by Iraq and Afghanistan-stationed soldiers and their spouses.  Foreword by Colum McCann (Let the Great World Spin), with contributions from David Abrams (Fobbit), Phil Klay (The New York Times), and Brian Turner (NPR). 

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The Queen's Agent

Knowledge is power, and Sir Francis Walsingham, England's first great spymaster, understood that perfectly. At a time when England, a Protestant country, was surrounded by Catholics plotting to invade, and rival powers within, he did what it took to save Elizabeth I -- and her embattled country. Historian John Cooper's account of his efforts, and his life (c. 1532 to 1590), proves as thrilling as any spy novel.

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The Rainbow Troops

A phenomenal bestseller in the author's native Indonesia, and already turned into a highly praised film, this semi-autobiographical coming-of-age novel by Andrea Hirata charts the fortunes of a posse of poor young students eager for knowledge in a culture where such aspirations are not always honored among their socio-economic class.

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The River Swimmer

A divorced professor, reunited with his high school sweetheart, and seventeen year old Thad Love, a swimming phenom prone to fistfights, star in Jim Harrison’s matched pair of novellas.

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The Death of Bees

Fifteen-year-old Marnie Doyle and her kid sister Nelly are on their own: free from their neglectful parents, and living with a little secret buried in the backyard.  By turns whimsical and macabre, Lisa O’Donnell’s debut novel has been named a Discover Great New Writers selection for Spring 2013.

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Alone on the Ice

A marvelous, chilling account of Douglas Mawson’s death-defying 1913 expedition of Antarctica, illustrated by Frank Hurley's never-before-published photographs of the journey.

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A History of the Present Illness

Physician and short story writer Louise Aronson puts her stethoscope to the heart of a San Francisco hospital.

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News from Heaven: The Bakerton Stories

Jennifer Haigh delivers interwoven tales of working class humanity in the coal mining country of Bakerton, Pennsylvania, sharply returning to the world of her revered 2005 novel Baker Towers.  Spanning decades, Haigh magnifies a community's will to endure economic grief and heartbreak in each artfully crafted tale.

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July 26: On this day in 1602 "A booke called the Revenge of Hamlett Prince Denmarke" was entered in the Stationers' Register by printer James Robertes.

Crime fiction legends Dennis Lehane and Michael Connelly discuss the new book that unites their beloved sleuths Patrick Kenzie and Harry Bosch.

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