Displaying articles for: October 2013

Please Kill Me

In memory of Lou Reed (1942-2013), we return to Legs McNeil and Gillian McCain's definitive oral history of punk rock, which opens with pioneer Reed stating of the movement, "The music gave you back your beat so you could dream."

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The Night Guest

A thrilling psychological portrait of an aging mother, isolated in her home by the Australian seaside until she receives a visit from a live-in nurse with dark secrets of her own.

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Vintage Attraction

A frustrated young teacher and a bewitching sommelier begin a love affair as complicated as the flavors beneath a Pinot Noir in this unique and scintillating novel.

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Camelot's Court

Robert Dallek, one of JFK's most revered biographers, turns his focus to the supporting cast of the Kennedy White House, and the surprising machinations of the president's inner circle.

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As Flies to Whatless Boys

Young love blossoms in the colonies of 19th-century Trinidad, as two Brits wrestle with the limitations of social class, and a rebellion that yields tragic consequences.

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The Gamble

A unique statistical history of the 2012 presidential election, analyzing the strategic choices of both Romney and Obama that decided the outcome of their respective campaigns.

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Songs of Willow Frost

A Chinese-American orphan boy believes he's found his mother - now an exotic Hollywood starlet - in this sweeping novel of Depression-era Seattle.

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My Poems Won't Change the World

Italian poet Patrizia Cavelli's groundbreaking work is newly translated by such American poetic heavyweights as Jorie Graham and David Shapiro.

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The Tragedy of Liberation

Acclaimed historian Frank Dikotter explores the far-reaching and tragic consequences of the Chinese Revolution from 1945 to 1957, and its vast influence on China's current political climate.

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Tinderbox

A seemingly innocuous nanny starts showing a darker side to her psychotherapist employer in Lisa Gornick's creepy, perceptive novel.

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Cartwheel

Wronged innocent or heartless monster?  Jennifer duBois's portrait of a young woman accused of murder on her semester abroad turns a case from the headlines into the season's most wonderfully twisted tale.

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Noise

Guaranteed to change the way you listen to the world around you. From the early music of our Neaderthal ancestors to voicemails left by the dead, David Hendy explores the "sonic history" of humanity.

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Stay Up With Me

Tom Barbash's taut collection of stories grapples with the complexities of human connectivity, in the form of con men, single mothers and lustful professors.

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His Wife Leaves Him

A simple and devastating exploration of the darkest, most tender interiors of a husband in the wake of his wife's death, from National Book Award nominee Stephen Dixon (Interstate).

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Kansas City Lightning

Revolutionary saxophonist Charlie Parker's tragic and iconic trajectory is chronicled in a stellar study of Jazz and one of its pioneers.

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O My America!

Sara's Wheeler's winning history of six 1800s Englishwomen wrestles with a male-dominated culture and the trials of pilgrimage in America's infant plains states.

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Henry Darger, Throw Away Boy

Reclusive janitor Henry Darger lived a wild, disturbing existence through his writings and paintings, which were only discovered after his death. Jim Elledge brings us an eye-opening portrait of a misunderstood and conflicted artist.

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Looking for Strangers

A Holocaust survivor's amazing autobiography of growing up an orphan and building a life in San Francisco, while faced with the lingering influence of her departed mother.

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Longbourn

Belowstairs with the Bennets.  Jo Baker's servants-eye-view of Pride & Prejudice uncovers a yearning love story  in the lives of those who invisibly attend Austen's upper-crust lovers. 

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Wordbirds: An Irreverent Lexicon for the 21st Century

If your friend complains when you blunderschedule, try not to apologibe in response.  Liesl Schillinger's witty collection of necessary new words -- with charming avian illustrations from Elizabeth Zechel -- will have you on a jollyroll.

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The Modern Art Invasion

Picasso and Duchamp landed in New York in 1913, with revolutionary results.  Art history at its most explosive.

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Jack London: An American Life

An insightful look into the life of a great American writer and how it shaped his classic wilderness novels White Fang and The Call of the Wild.

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The Once and Future World

Award-winning ecology writer J.B. MacKinnon encourages the practice of "rewilding," or restoring nature to what it once was, in a hopeful treatise on reversing the human impact on the environment.

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Brother Kemal

25 years after Happy Birthday, Turk!, Jakob Arjouni's Turkish private eye Kemal Keyankaya returns to his former home of Frankfurt - where a new murder investigation case leads him into a vengeful web of deceit in the German art and publishing world. 

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Wonder Women

Subtitled "Sex, Power, and the Quest for Perfection," this sharp look into the role of women in the workplace was written by the current president of Barnard College.

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The Star of Istanbul

Robert Olen Butler's heroic war correspondent Christopher Marlowe Cobb (The Hot Country) returns in an espionage adventure on the Lusitania, wooing starlets and brawling with German agents aboard the infamous ship.

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Dog Songs

With elegant brevity, Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winner Mary Oliver celebrates the loyalty and joy of canines, namely her own dog Percy ("not/ thinking, not weighing anything, just running forward").

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The Aftermath

Rhidian Brook draws upon his own family history in this story of a British colonel who is charged with restoring a ruined Hamburg after the Nazi surrender, and who finds his own family's grief entwined with that of his German neighbors.  A Discover Great New Writers selection.

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Asunder

Two museum guards at London's National Gallery find their private lives and the artwork they protect intertwining in strange and unsettling ways.

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Script and Scribble

A witty and enjoyable foray into the history and future of handwriting around the world.

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The Message

Richard Wolffe's study of President Obama's reelection places a spotlight on the team that drove his campaign - from early infighting and power plays to ultimate victory. 

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The Dark Path

In his intensely personal memoir, David Schickler recounts his lifelong struggle between aspiring to become a Catholic priest and desiring relationships with women.

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The Rational Animal

Two psychology professors explore how evolution has influenced humanity's decision-making skills in a humorous and enlightening study of the inner self (ves).

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Sister Mother Husband Dog: Etc.

Delia Ephron, younger sibling of the late Nora, brings us her signature wit and wry prose in a collection of personal essays on love, writing, and her rivalrous and affectionate relationship with her older sister.

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The Letters of Paul Cezanne (Oct 1, 2013)

In correspondence with penpals like Emile Zola and Claude Monet, a father of modern art reveals his politics, desires, and pursuit of canvassed perfection.

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The Huguenots (Sept 23, 2013)

The rise, survival, and fall of the radical Protestants who came to promenance in seventeenth century France is viewed with expansive detail in this fine history from the aptly named Geoffrey Treasure.

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Tocqueville in Arabia

Like Alexis de Tocqueville and his classic account Democracy in America, Joshua Mitchell analyzes the potential for democracy in the Middle East post-Arab Spring, offering clarity on the troubled present and an optimistic view of the future.

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Smarter Than You Think

Clive Thompson believes technology is altering our brains – for the better.  His convincing case celebrates millionaires filmed 24/7, Chinese students protesting toxic waste, and video gamers working on a cure for HIV.

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Stories II

Aging rock stars, adolescent girls, and asteroid-slain dinosaurs star in the laugh riots and tearjerkers of T.C. Boyle, one of the eminent short story writers of our time.

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The Night of the Rambler

The Caribbean British territory of Anguilla’s fight for independence from neighboring isles Saint Kitts and Nevis is starkly detailed in Montague Kobbe’s debut, emerging in a fictionalized narrative of the fateful events of June 9, 1967.

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Consequences

Celebrated French author Phillipe Djian’s newest thriller brings us the disquieting story of a lothario professor, waking up next to the corpse of a student he previously seduced.

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April 19: "What you see first, after the starting gun's crack, is a column of bobbing runners, thousands of them, surging downhill..."

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

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