• CURRENT EVENTS

Now I Know Who My Comrades Are

Is the Internet revolutionizing global dissent?

 

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  • CURRENT EVENTS

Words Will Break Cement: The Passion of Pussy Riot

A whimsical protest in Russia earned three women the wrath of the government -- and a chance at heroism.

 

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  • CURRENT EVENTS

Little America

A reporter goes behind the lines and finds the deep divides that hampered the American "good war" against the Taliban.

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  • CURRENT EVENTS

China in Ten Words

A "tiny lexicon" captures the paradoxes of the world's most populous country.

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  • CURRENT EVENTS

In a Land of Silence

A heartbreaking report on resistance and graffiti from Libya, courtesy of Granta.

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  • current events

Ill Fares the Land

A distillation of the historian's career-long engagement with the vicissitude of 20th-century history and ideology.

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  • current events

The Big Short

The author of Liars’ Poker finds the financial raiders who knew the bubble was destined to burst – and made a historic profit when it did. Read more...

April 24: "[The HST] lifted a curtain from our view of the universe, changing it so profoundly that no human can look at the stars in the same way..."

Kenneth Calhoun (Black Moon) and Lysley Tenorio (Monstress) of the Discover Great New Writers program on B-movies, heritage, and finales.

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
In the Light of What We Know

Zia Haider Rahman's mystery of a brilliant Bangladeshi mathematician's past barrels through the Ivy League, London high finance, and spy-haunted Afghanistan in a page-turning tale of exile, intrigue and the price of friendship. A Discover Great New Writers selection.

The People's Platform

Once touted as the foundation for tomorrow's digital democracy, the Internet is increasingly ruled by a few corporate giants, while millions of contributors till its fields for free. Astra Taylor looks at why the web has failed to deliver a communitarian cyberscape, and offers a compelling case for restoring its original vision.

A Private Venus

Dubbed "the Italian Simenon," Giorgio Scerbanenco (1911-1969) began his crime-writing career with books set in the USA, but quickly shifted scene closer to home, the city of Milan.  In this adventure, appearing in English for the first time, his underdog hero Dr. Duca Lamberti finds himself in the middle of a seedy, scantily clad criminal racket, where the presence of an outsider could result in death.