• CULTURAL HISTORY

Cubed: A Secret History of the Workplace

Thinking outside the box of twentieth-century office life.

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  • CULTURAL HISTORY

American Fun

An argument that wicked play outweighs hard work in our country's heritage.

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  • CULTURAL HISTORY

Before the Crash

Two new books drink in the excesses (and mornings after) of the Jazz Age.

 

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  • CULTURAL HISTORY

Falling Upwards

As the craze for ballooning swept Europe, scientists and thrill seekers alike sought a god's-eye-view.

 

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  • CULTURAL HISTORY

The Discovery of Middle Earth

How the Druids charted Europe (and the Romans took the credit).

 

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  • CULTURAL HISTORY

On Paper

How a civilization built itself out of wood pulp and ink.

 

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  • CULTURAL HISTORY

The Art of Controversy

The former editor of The Nation provides an illustrated tour of comic provocation and satire.

 

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  • CULTURAL HISTORY

My American Revolution

Can the ghost of 1776 be discerned in the highway-striped landscape of a twenty-first-century nation?

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  • CULTURAL HISTORY

Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend

The eventful life—and surprising legacy—of the original movie dog.

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  • CULTURAL HISTORY

97 Orchard

The history of a building on Manhattan's Lower East Side yields a portrait of immigrant New York in all of its richness. Read more...

  • cultural history

Still Life

An author's investigation into the surprisingly long-lived world of taxidermy. Read more...

April 23: " 'A job,' the woman repeated again, smiling, as if I hadn't heard her. 'Would you like one?' "

Kenneth Calhoun (Black Moon) and Lysley Tenorio (Monstress) of the Discover Great New Writers program on B-movies, heritage, and finales.

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
In the Light of What We Know

Zia Haider Rahman's mystery of a brilliant Bangladeshi mathematician's past barrels through the Ivy League, London high finance, and spy-haunted Afghanistan in a page-turning tale of exile, intrigue and the price of friendship. A Discover Great New Writers selection.

The People's Platform

Once touted as the foundation for tomorrow's digital democracy, the Internet is increasingly ruled by a few corporate giants, while millions of contributors till its fields for free. Astra Taylor looks at why the web has failed to deliver a communitarian cyberscape, and offers a compelling case for restoring its original vision.

A Private Venus

Dubbed "the Italian Simenon," Giorgio Scerbanenco (1911-1969) began his crime-writing career with books set in the USA, but quickly shifted scene closer to home, the city of Milan.  In this adventure, appearing in English for the first time, his underdog hero Dr. Duca Lamberti finds himself in the middle of a seedy, scantily clad criminal racket, where the presence of an outsider could result in death.