Displaying articles for: September 2012

Wolf Story

When the child takes over the bedtime story, the villain -- and the parent -- is put through his paces.

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Air

From gentle breezes to devastating storms, this element shapes our world.

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The Yellow Birds

A young veteran of the war in Iraq turns to fiction in his struggle to make sense of a perplexing combat.

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The Oath

How the Roberts Court became the administration's most unpredictable opponent.

 

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Joseph Anton

Salman Rushdie unfolds the story of a writer''s life plunged into nightmare by a dying cleric's verdict on his novel.

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The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving

On the road in search of self-awareness.

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Meander: East to West, Indirectly, Along a Turkish River

Following the lazy twists and turns of a river steeped in history and threatened by corruption.

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Laura Lamont's Life in Pictures

A star on the rise during Hollywood's Golden Age.

 

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Strom Thurmond's America

The Senate's champion of segregation endured long after the Dixiecrats were history.

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Gravity's Engines

How black holes paint the universe, and other wonders of the cosmos.

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NW

The novelist maps a twenty-first century city through the lives of four of its natives.

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Mortality

A matchless man of letters contemplates the end.

 

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April 23: " 'A job,' the woman repeated again, smiling, as if I hadn't heard her. 'Would you like one?' "

Kenneth Calhoun (Black Moon) and Lysley Tenorio (Monstress) of the Discover Great New Writers program on B-movies, heritage, and finales.

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
In the Light of What We Know

Zia Haider Rahman's mystery of a brilliant Bangladeshi mathematician's past barrels through the Ivy League, London high finance, and spy-haunted Afghanistan in a page-turning tale of exile, intrigue and the price of friendship. A Discover Great New Writers selection.

The People's Platform

Once touted as the foundation for tomorrow's digital democracy, the Internet is increasingly ruled by a few corporate giants, while millions of contributors till its fields for free. Astra Taylor looks at why the web has failed to deliver a communitarian cyberscape, and offers a compelling case for restoring its original vision.

A Private Venus

Dubbed "the Italian Simenon," Giorgio Scerbanenco (1911-1969) began his crime-writing career with books set in the USA, but quickly shifted scene closer to home, the city of Milan.  In this adventure, appearing in English for the first time, his underdog hero Dr. Duca Lamberti finds himself in the middle of a seedy, scantily clad criminal racket, where the presence of an outsider could result in death.