Displaying articles for: September 2009

The Good Soldiers

An infantry battalion's journey -- physical and psychological -- into combat, and back again. Read more...

Juliet, Naked

The author of High Fidelity returns to a favorite subject: the heart of the pop music fan. Read more...

Her Fearful Symmetry

A new literary haunting from the author of The Time Traveler’s Wife. Read more...

There Once Lived a Woman Who Tried to Kill Her Neighbor's Baby

A new collection of stories from the Russian author stages 21st-century crises in a dream-haunted world. Read more...

Word Upon Word: Reading in a Foreign Language

A reader sets sail on the high seas of another tongue. Read more...

The Locust and the Bird

The acclaimed author of Women of Sand and Myrrh reimagines her mother’s life in the Beirut of the '30s and '40s. Read more...

True Compass

The long-awaited memoir from the Lion of the Senate testifies to the centrality of the Kennedy identity in his life and career. Read more...

Dancing in the Dark

The odyssey of the Joads and the screwball antics of Grant and Hepburn are both part of this landmark overview of the culture of the Great Depression. Read more...

Nocturnes: Five Stories of Music and Nightfall

A musically themed suite of stories, from the author of The Remains of the Day and Never Let Me Go. Read more...

Hardball

Sara Paretsky's groundbreaking private detective is back, reluctantly digging up family secrets. Read more...

The Pattern in the Carpet

Heller McAlpin reviews an intriguing puzzle of a memoir. Read more...

Justice: What's the Right Thing to Do?

A legendary teacher and scholar on one of the thorniest questions in philosophy. Read more...

Runaway Dream

In May of 1974, Jon Landau saw a little-known band open for Bonnie Raitt in Harvard Square, then went home and penned perhaps the most famous line in all of pop music criticism: "I saw rock and roll's future and its name is Bruce Springsteen." Read more...

The Anthologist

A poet's struggles with the quotidian make up the plot of the new novel from the author of Human Smoke. Read more...

Where Men Win Glory

Jon Krakauer investigates an uncommon soldier's death, and uncovers a tale of tragic dimensions. Read more...

The Lost Symbol

Sarah Weinman on Dan Brown's narrative alchemy, at work once again. Read more...

Homer & Langley

The strange true tale of the Collyer brothers becomes a fable of Rip Van Winkles in Manhattan. Read more...

Redactor Agonistes

An editor's diagnosis of the crisis in book publishing. Read more...

A Gate at the Stairs

In the new novel from the author of Birds of America, a nanny, her charge, and the girl's adoptive mother form an uneasy triangle. Read more...

Await Your Reply

Six characters in search of identity. Read more...

Shooting Stars

Portrait of the hoopster as a young man. Read more...

The Magician’s Elephant

From the award-winning author, a tale in the tradition of Hans Christian Andersen. Read more...

Dawn Light

The early bird gets more than the worm. Read more...

The Adderall Diaries

An attempt to delve into an enigmatic murder case yields a book that deliberately clouds the border between memoir and fiction. Read more...

The Skating Rink

Intrigue on ice -- and not all the blades are on the skates. Read more...

Crow Planet

In the croak of the raven, a naturalist hears the echo of human song. Read more...

April 19: "What you see first, after the starting gun's crack, is a column of bobbing runners, thousands of them, surging downhill..."

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.