Displaying articles for: August 2010

Prejudices

The brawny eloquence and fistic wit of H. L. Mencken at his most intemperate.

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Three Stations

Arkady Renko, the hero of Gorky Park, fights age and a corrupt Moscow in a dark thriller.

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Saxophone Colossus

The genius and grandeur of the incomparable tenor saxophonist Sonny Rollins is celebrated in text and photographs.

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The Hare with Amber Eyes

Edmund de Waal traces his Jewish family—and their collection of Japanese netsuki—through 19th- and 20th-century European history.

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Freedom

In his first novel in nine years, the author of The Corrections delivers another powerfully observant American family saga.

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The Tenth Parallel

A journalist tours the globe's most troubled regions and finds threads of faith and power that connect far-flung conflicts.

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Bad Penny Blues

Cathi Unsworth's London-set crime novels lure readers into a sinister realm that is lurid, thrilling, and unforgettable.

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The Cross of Redemption

Previously uncollected writings by one of the most eloquent of all 20th-century American writers illuminate politics, sport, culture—and the author himself.

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Pied Piper and The Breaking Wave

Two novels set in the Second World War reveal the sly yet shocking storytelling genius of Nevil Shute (1899-1960).

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A Short History of Celebrity

A cultural historian tracks the rise and rise of the culture of fame, from Byron to Cary Grant and beyond.

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August's Last Chapter

Ten books to consider for your last summer reading.

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I Curse the River of Time

In the new novel from the author of Out Stealing Horses, grief and comedy share the stage.

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The Buenos Aires Affair

An Argentinean author's reimagining of the detective thriller as a smorgasbord of false documents, with the reader as detective meant to tie the clues together.

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The Man Who Never Returned

A hard-boiled novel based on the mysterious disappearance of Judge Crater.

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The Great Divorce

The true story of one mother's crusade to reclaim her children sheds light on the history of a famous religious sect, and women's struggle for legal rights.

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The Breakup 2.0

A surprising study of how social media is transforming modern courtship in ways Jane Austen might recognize.

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April 24: "[The HST] lifted a curtain from our view of the universe, changing it so profoundly that no human can look at the stars in the same way..."

Kenneth Calhoun (Black Moon) and Lysley Tenorio (Monstress) of the Discover Great New Writers program on B-movies, heritage, and finales.

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
In the Light of What We Know

Zia Haider Rahman's mystery of a brilliant Bangladeshi mathematician's past barrels through the Ivy League, London high finance, and spy-haunted Afghanistan in a page-turning tale of exile, intrigue and the price of friendship. A Discover Great New Writers selection.

The People's Platform

Once touted as the foundation for tomorrow's digital democracy, the Internet is increasingly ruled by a few corporate giants, while millions of contributors till its fields for free. Astra Taylor looks at why the web has failed to deliver a communitarian cyberscape, and offers a compelling case for restoring its original vision.

A Private Venus

Dubbed "the Italian Simenon," Giorgio Scerbanenco (1911-1969) began his crime-writing career with books set in the USA, but quickly shifted scene closer to home, the city of Milan.  In this adventure, appearing in English for the first time, his underdog hero Dr. Duca Lamberti finds himself in the middle of a seedy, scantily clad criminal racket, where the presence of an outsider could result in death.