Displaying articles for: August 2008

Sustainable Culture

Edward Champion on the intergalactic ambitions of Iain M. Banks?s series of speculative novels. Read more...

Grand New Party

A prescription for Republican renewal. Read more...

Mother on Fire

The question of where the author would send her daughters to school prompts a hilariously outraged reflection on contemporary culture. Read more...

Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do (and What It Says About Us)

How you merge says more about you than you think. Read more...

Man in the Dark

A bedtime story turns on its teller. Read more...

Universe of Stone: A Biography of Chartres Cathedral

Exploring a philosophy set in stone and stained glass. Read more...

Convention Flashback: Miami and the Siege of Chicago

Tom Carson on Miami and the Siege of Chicago, Norman Mailer's classic account of the 1968 conventions. Read more...

A Better Angel

Tales of the flesh and the spirit -- in which both feel the pull of gravity. Read more...

Let Them In: The Case for Open Borders

An argument for more open borders, from a politically conservative perspective. Read more...

What I Talk About When I Talk About Running

The idiosyncratic novelist tells the true story of his long-running race against his own body's limits. Read more...

Ghost Train to the Eastern Star

The author revisits the railway journey he chronicled three decades ago, through a transformed continent. Read more...

The Three of Us: A Family Story

A self-tormenting family's drama, shot through with moments of beauty. Read more...

The Turnaround

Race-baiting, a wrong turn, and the complex aftermath of violence in the latest from a socially conscious crime novelist. Read more...

Fear and Loathing: On the Campaign Trail '72

Fresh off his hallucinogenic chronicle of Las Vegas, the founder of Gonzo journalism staggered his way through a presidential election -- and delivered a political classic. Read more...

Palace Council

The author of The Emperor of Ocean Park pens a story of political intrigue in the era of Watergate. Read more...

The Forsaken: An American Tragedy in Stalin's Russia

Thousands of Americans immigrated to the USSR in pursuit of a socialist utopia. What happened to them? Read more...

The Legend of Colton H. Bryant

Seeking the extraordinary in the life of "ordinary" man from Wyoming. Read more...

Flaw

Pulling back the curtain on a Polish writer?s darkly satiricial mastery. Read more...

Shadow Country: Nature and History

John Freeman looks at landscape, fiction, and history in Peter Matthiesen?s refashioned Florida epic. Read more...

Rome 1960: The Olympics That Changed the World

At the Cold War's height, the Olympic Games were also a proxy battle between superpowers. Read more...

The End

A debut novel about unrest in an immigrant neighborhood channels Faulkner and Joyce. Read more...

Bottlemania

Is it time to get rid of bottled water? And is tap water truly the answer? Read more...

How Fiction Works

The iconoclastic literary critic examines the inner workings of the novel. Read more...

The Novels of John P. Marquand

The subtle, powerful satire of a writer who focused on the close-at-hand. Read more...

The Secret Scripture

An aging denizen of a mental institution unfolds the story of her youth -- and the secrets that led to her incarceration. Read more...

Woman of Rome: A Life of Elsa Morante

The dramatic life of an iconoclastic Italian writer. Read more...

April 19: "What you see first, after the starting gun's crack, is a column of bobbing runners, thousands of them, surging downhill..."

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.