Displaying articles for: July 2010

The Hundred-Foot Journey

A novel of life in the kitchen yields a sumptuous feast for readers.

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97 Orchard

The history of a building on Manhattan's Lower East Side yields a portrait of immigrant New York in all of its richness. Read more...

The Artist Pursued

The most illuminating interviews with novelists may be the ones they weave into their fictions.

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Super Sad True Love Story

A tale of love's labors in a New York of the near future, from the celebrated comic novelist.

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The Elements of Euclid

A welcome new edition of Oliver Byrne's 1847 Elements of Euclid, a masterpiece of printing and design—and one of oddest and most beautiful books of the 19th century.

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Duel at Dawn

An engaging chronicle of the perils and passions of mathematical genius in the Romantic age.

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Zoo Story

Tigers escape and elephants fly in this chronicle of a Florida zoo’s days.

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The Price of Altruism

A biography of George Price, an enigmatic figure in evolutionary biology—visionary, showman, scientist, gadfly.

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The Cookbook Collector

Rare books outbid giant redwoods, stock prices soar and dive, and two sisters pursue happiness in a Sense and Sensibility for the digital age.

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Lay the Favorite

Beth Raymer offers a Runyonesque memoir of her years working alongside sports bookies and high rollers. Read more...

The Hermès Scarf

A collection of designs from the celebrated firm highlights the visual splendor hidden in a scarf's folds.

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A Thousand Peaceful Cities

An ineffectual plot to kill the Kremlin’s viceroy Warsaw provides the impetus for this antic comic novel by a contemporary Polish master. Read more...

Captivity

A new novel revisits the elaborately faked set of séances of the famed Fox sisters.

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The Disappearing Spoon

A history of the periodic table romps playfully through the chemistry labs of the past.

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Pedigree

A surprisingly expansive tale of ordinary life from the creator of terse tales of mystery and crime.

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The Wagon

A cop's-eye-view of Chicago in true stories that channel the restless spirit of Walt Whitman.

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In Rough Country

Facing personal loss, the prolific novelist turns to the books and authors that have fired her life's work. Read more...

Father of the Rain

A daughter fights to survive the emotional cyclone of her family's needs.

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April 17: "In less than three years, both GM and Chrysler would be bankrupt, and a resurgent Ford would wow Wall Street..."

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.