Displaying articles for: July 2009

The Link: Uncovering Our Earliest Ancestor

Is the ballyhooed "Ida" the missing link -- or merely the first celebrity fossil? Read more...

The Foundation Pit

A searing satire details the human costs of the Soviet Union's monstrous ambition. Read more...

The King of Vodka: The Story of Pyotr Smirnov and the Upheaval of an Empire

The history of one of the most famous names in liquor is also the history of Russia's emergence into the modern world. Read more...

The Girl Who Played with Fire

The follow-up to The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo dives into the enigma of a young woman's past. Read more...

Empire of Illusion

Do our culture's fractured and fevered attentions divert us from the ideal of a functioning democracy? Read more...

Free: The Future of a Radical Price

The editor of Wired explains how we can get what we don't pay for. Read more...

Byron in Love: A Short Daring Life

The novelist examines an age?s obsession -- and her own -- with the mad, bad, dangerous poet. Read more...

The Earth Hums in B Flat

A young girl?s visions spur her to investigate a man's disappearance from her home village in Wales. Read more...

Bitter Spring: A Life of Ignazio Silone

The political and literary life of the author of a 20th-century masterpiece, Bread and Wine. Read more...

A Short History of Women

A suffragette?s fatal struggle with "the woman question" extends through five generations. Read more...

The Age of Wonder: How the Romantic Generation Discovered the Beauty and Terror of Science

The biographer of Shelley and Coleridge maps the explosive effects of an era of "Romantic Science." Read more...

Rain Gods

The author leaves behind bayous and the Big Easy for a harshly compelling South Texas tale. Read more...

Gabriel García Márquez: A Life

The life of a master of storytelling yields a narrative as weighty as one of its subject's own novels. Read more...

The Invisible Hook: The Hidden Economics of Pirates

What the dismal science can tell us about the men who sailed under the Jolly Roger. Read more...

Civic War and the Corruption of the Citizen

A plea for the return of the citizen to the center of political life. Read more...

In the Graveyard of Empires: America's War in Afghanistan

In this new look at the NATO invasion of Afghanistan, the author sees echoes of ancient campaigns. Read more...

The Walkable City: From Haussmann's Boulevards to Jane Jacobs' Streets and Beyond

What would life be like if driving weren't the only way to get there? Read more...

Dangerous Games: The Uses and Abuses of History

A historian reflects on the contradictions at the heart of her profession. Read more...

Exiles in the Garden

A lost age of Washington power shadows this tale of a photographer's uneasy truce with himself. Read more...

By His Own Rules

In the first full-length biography of the controversial secretary of defense, an infamous career takes on a nearly tragic dimension. Read more...

The Ascent of George Washington: The Hidden Political Genius of an American Icon

How the man made himself into a living monument. Read more...

Our Lot: How Real Estate Came to Own Us

The anatomy of a bubble. Read more...

April 21: " 'Pull' includes 'invitations to tea' at which one hears smiling reminders that a better life is available to people who stop talking about massacres..."

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.