Displaying articles for: July 2008

Woman of Rome: A Life of Elsa Morante

The dramatic life of an iconoclastic Italian writer. Read more...

Empires of the Sea: The Siege of Malta, the Battle of Lepanto, and the Contest for the Center of the World

The 16th-century clash of two civilizations produced some of the most memorable -- and bloody -- maritime battles in history. Read more...

A Case of Exploding Mangoes

A sharp-eyed cadet navigates the Kafkaesque terrain of Pakistan?s military hierarchy in this debut novel. Read more...

Beijing Coma

A Chinese family?s struggle with repression, echoing in the mind of a victim of Tiananmen Square. Read more...

Dark Rainbow

Paul Di Filippo looks at four new books that showcase the capacious possibilities within fantasy?s darker reaches. Read more...

Not in the Flesh

Ruth Rendell?s Inspector Wexford investigates an old body -- and continues to mourn society?s decline. Read more...

While They Slept: An Inquiry into the Murder of a Family

An author?s obsession with an enigmatic atrocity leads to a surprising confrontation with the aftermath of violence. Read more...

Note by Note: A Celebration of the Piano Lesson

The underappreciated importance of the piano lesson. Read more...

The Library at Night

Memoir, history, and philosophy join together in the work of a committed bibliophile. Read more...

Slumberland

A quest for sound takes a DJ to post-Cold War Berlin in this picaresque send-up of racial and cultural preconceptions. Read more...

Of Weight and Loss: Four Memoirs

Sarah Norris on memoirs that chart attempts to reshape the self -- literally. Read more...

Before Green Gables

Can a classic of children?s literature survive a prequel? A lifelong fan reports. Read more...

This Land Is Their Land

The author of Nickel and Dimed takes aim at the powers that be. Read more...

The Story of Forgetting

In this debut novel, both the burden of memory and the terror of its loss take their toll. Read more...

Language for a New Century: Contemporary Poetry from the Middle East, Asia, and Beyond

The muse goes global in an international anthology of contemporary poetry. Read more...

Dinosaurs on the Roof

An imagined afterlife is at the core of this domestic drama. Read more...

The Next American Century: How the U.S. Can Thrive as Other Nations Rise

Where should the next captain steer the ship of state? Read more...

The Story of Edgar Sawtelle

A voiceless young man and his canine companions are the center of a reimagined Hamlet. Read more...

Prague in Danger

An account -- both personal and historical -- of life during the Nazi occupation of Czechoslovakia Read more...

Exiles

A terrible shipwreck moves a tormented poet to return to his craft, in a novel based on the life of Gerard Manley Hopkins. Read more...

The Unthinkable: Who Survives When Disaster Strikes -- and Why

The stories of survivors yield insights into how ordinary people can face extraordinary dangers. Read more...

The White King

A debut novel maps the uncertain terrain of a boy?s life in Ceauçescu?s Romania. Read more...

The Americans

Half a century later, the photographer?s images still contain unsettling power. Read more...

America America

A politician and his patron shoot for the White House and fall from grace. Read more...

Sleeping It Off in Rapid City

Poems new and old consider manhood, travel, and America itself. Read more...

April 24: "[The HST] lifted a curtain from our view of the universe, changing it so profoundly that no human can look at the stars in the same way..."

Kenneth Calhoun (Black Moon) and Lysley Tenorio (Monstress) of the Discover Great New Writers program on B-movies, heritage, and finales.

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
In the Light of What We Know

Zia Haider Rahman's mystery of a brilliant Bangladeshi mathematician's past barrels through the Ivy League, London high finance, and spy-haunted Afghanistan in a page-turning tale of exile, intrigue and the price of friendship. A Discover Great New Writers selection.

The People's Platform

Once touted as the foundation for tomorrow's digital democracy, the Internet is increasingly ruled by a few corporate giants, while millions of contributors till its fields for free. Astra Taylor looks at why the web has failed to deliver a communitarian cyberscape, and offers a compelling case for restoring its original vision.

A Private Venus

Dubbed "the Italian Simenon," Giorgio Scerbanenco (1911-1969) began his crime-writing career with books set in the USA, but quickly shifted scene closer to home, the city of Milan.  In this adventure, appearing in English for the first time, his underdog hero Dr. Duca Lamberti finds himself in the middle of a seedy, scantily clad criminal racket, where the presence of an outsider could result in death.