Displaying articles for: June 2009

Our Lot: How Real Estate Came to Own Us

The anatomy of a bubble. Read more...

The Ignorance of Blood

The city of Seville broods over intrigues both domestic and international in Robert Wilson's new novel. Read more...

Satchel: The Life and Times of an American Legend

The astounding career of the "Million Dollar String Bean." Read more...

Shop Class as Soul Craft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work

Can the answer to modern anomie be found in the act of rebuilding a car engine? Read more...

The Secret Sentry: The Untold History of the National Security Agency

A new book throws light on what often seems the most shadowy aspect of the U.S. intelligence community. Read more...

Let the Great World Spin

A man's unlikely balancing act lends momentary grace to the chaos of a fragmenting city. Read more...

Lost in the Meritocracy: The Undereducation of an Overachiever

A young man's eastward odyssey from Minnesota to Princeton and beyond. Read more...

White Is for Witching

A malevolent house works its will on a family in this heady gothic tale. Read more...

Lean, Mean, and High-Toned Too: Richard Stark's Parker Novels

The enduring appeal of Richard Stark's dedicated crime professional, Parker. Read more...

Stone's Fall

The death of a turn-of-the-century arms tycoon uncovers a shadow world of finance. Read more...

A Brain Wider than the Sky: A Migraine Diary

The pain-fueled odyssey of a migraineur. Read more...

Last Journey: A Father and Son in Wartime

A father's mission to complete his son's book -- left unfinished when he was killed in the line of duty. Read more...

The Thing Around Your Neck

From the author of Half of a Yellow Sun, tales of life caught between the Old World and the New. Read more...

In the Kitchen

In her new novel, the author of Brick Lane finds urban unease simmering on a restaurant's stoves. Read more...

Four Freedoms

The author of Little, Big turns from fairyland to life on the home front during WWII. Read more...

Between the Assassinations

In these tales from the author of The White Tiger, India?s diverse cultures are united by the pursuit of wealth and power. Read more...

Is God a Mathematician?

An argument that playing with numbers is the quintessentially human trait. Read more...

The Story Sisters

A novel of three sisters whose charmed lives prove not so charming. Read more...

Bubble Gum-shoes: The Rise of the Kid Sleuth

The boy detective grows up, in a manner of speaking. Read more...

The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work

Is the modern conception of work an unpleasant necessity? An evolutionary aberration? Or a key to happiness? Read more...

My Father's Tears and Other Stories

Updike's final collection of stories reveals an imagination continually alive to the astonishments of reality.

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Red April

A darkly comic thriller in a Peruvian town haunted by the memory of terror. Read more...

Resilience: Reflections on the Burdens and Gifts of Facing Life's Adversities

Elizabeth Edwards returns to the scene of her husband's marital crime, in search of its lessons. Read more...

How to Sell

The world of high-end jewelry salesmen rendered in diamond-hard prose. Read more...

April 24: "[The HST] lifted a curtain from our view of the universe, changing it so profoundly that no human can look at the stars in the same way..."

Kenneth Calhoun (Black Moon) and Lysley Tenorio (Monstress) of the Discover Great New Writers program on B-movies, heritage, and finales.

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
In the Light of What We Know

Zia Haider Rahman's mystery of a brilliant Bangladeshi mathematician's past barrels through the Ivy League, London high finance, and spy-haunted Afghanistan in a page-turning tale of exile, intrigue and the price of friendship. A Discover Great New Writers selection.

The People's Platform

Once touted as the foundation for tomorrow's digital democracy, the Internet is increasingly ruled by a few corporate giants, while millions of contributors till its fields for free. Astra Taylor looks at why the web has failed to deliver a communitarian cyberscape, and offers a compelling case for restoring its original vision.

A Private Venus

Dubbed "the Italian Simenon," Giorgio Scerbanenco (1911-1969) began his crime-writing career with books set in the USA, but quickly shifted scene closer to home, the city of Milan.  In this adventure, appearing in English for the first time, his underdog hero Dr. Duca Lamberti finds himself in the middle of a seedy, scantily clad criminal racket, where the presence of an outsider could result in death.