Displaying articles for: June 2008

Sleeping It Off in Rapid City

Poems new and old consider manhood, travel, and America itself. Read more...

Newton: Ackroyd's Brief Lives

Peter Ackroyd?s brief life brings depth to an icon of science most of us know only glancingly. Read more...

The Delighted States

A wild chase in pursuit of the nature of the novel, across centuries and continents. Read more...

Original Sin: A Cultural History

The complicated history behind the idea that we?re born bad. Read more...

The Gift of Rain

A graceful martial art and a monstrous betrayal are at the heart of this atmospheric novel. Read more...

The Forger's Spell: A True Story of Vermeer, Nazis, and the Greatest Art Hoax of the Twentieth Century

How a con man with a paintbrush pulled one over on the art world ?- and the Nazis. Read more...

Dark Age Detection: Historical Mysteries, Part Two

Sarah Weinman dives back into the pages of historical mysteries, in search of court conspiracies, nefarious knights, and murderous monasteries. Read more...

The Mayor's Tongue

In an audacious debut, intertwining tales follow a transatlantic course. Read more...

Little Brother

The blogger and creator of Boing Boing delivers a sprightly dystopia set in a fearful USA. Read more...

The Bishop?s Daughter

A daughter?s portrayal of her clergyman father?s inner struggle takes in the tumult
of an era. Read more...

A Voyage Long and Strange: Rediscovering the New World

An intrepid traveler follows a century?s worth of neglected American discoverers. Read more...

Soldiers of Reason: The RAND Corporation and the Rise of the American Empire

How a defense industry think tank became the nexus of the ?military-industrial complex.? Read more...

Northern Land: The Novels of Sarah Hall

Ed Champion on the seductive prose of Sarah Hall, the author of Haweswater and The Electric Michaelangelo. Read more...

The White Tiger

Our review of the just-announced Man Booker Prize winner -- first run on June 16, 2008. Read more...

Devil May Care

Martinis and all, Agent 007 is resurrected by the author of Charlotte Gray. Read more...

McMafia: A Journey Through the Global Criminal Underworld

Mapping the next generation of organized crime as a global, decentralized enterprise. Read more...

Love and the Incredibly Old Man

The discovery of the Fountain of Youth is part of the backdrop in Lee Siegel's tall tale. Read more...

Is Milton Better than Shakespeare?

An argument that the author of Paradise Lost remains a critical voice today. Read more...

Letters from Exile: Styron's Havanas in Camelot

Sheri Holman examines the divided soul in William Styron's posthumously colllected essays. Read more...

The Enchantress of Florence

The author of Midnight's Children offers an imaginary encounter between the Florence of the Medicis and the Mughal court. Read more...

The Film Club

A film critic father tries his own version of homeschooling. Read more...

The Craftsman

The link between the work
of the hand and the mind, reconsidered. Read more...

The God of War

In a landscape transformed by human folly, a perilous coming-of-age. Read more...

Inventing Niagara: Beauty, Power, and Lies

The unnatural history of a natural wonder. Read more...

City of Thieves

A story of the siege of Leningrad, a dozen eggs, and a quest for survival itself. Read more...

April 24: "[The HST] lifted a curtain from our view of the universe, changing it so profoundly that no human can look at the stars in the same way..."

Kenneth Calhoun (Black Moon) and Lysley Tenorio (Monstress) of the Discover Great New Writers program on B-movies, heritage, and finales.

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
In the Light of What We Know

Zia Haider Rahman's mystery of a brilliant Bangladeshi mathematician's past barrels through the Ivy League, London high finance, and spy-haunted Afghanistan in a page-turning tale of exile, intrigue and the price of friendship. A Discover Great New Writers selection.

The People's Platform

Once touted as the foundation for tomorrow's digital democracy, the Internet is increasingly ruled by a few corporate giants, while millions of contributors till its fields for free. Astra Taylor looks at why the web has failed to deliver a communitarian cyberscape, and offers a compelling case for restoring its original vision.

A Private Venus

Dubbed "the Italian Simenon," Giorgio Scerbanenco (1911-1969) began his crime-writing career with books set in the USA, but quickly shifted scene closer to home, the city of Milan.  In this adventure, appearing in English for the first time, his underdog hero Dr. Duca Lamberti finds himself in the middle of a seedy, scantily clad criminal racket, where the presence of an outsider could result in death.