Displaying articles for: May 2011

Daniel Stein, Interpreter

The true story of a Holocaust survivor turned Carmelite monk is refashioned into a moving tale that "makes the improbable believable."

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Confessions of a Young Novelist

A "characteristically sly" memoir of the writer's work as an architect of meticulously detailed fictions. 

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The Clamorgans

Following a prominent Midwestern clan through generations, and shifting identities.

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The Sojourn

A story of a World War I sniper's dreams of glory, and the terrible reality of combat.

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The Novels of Heinrich Böll

Heinrich Böll's novels confront the horror of Germany's past—and its willingness to turn away.

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The Greater Journey

Following in the footsteps of nineteenth-century Americans in the City of Light.

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Tabloid City

The tale of a socialite's murder occasions a last, loving look around the beloved and disappearing newsroom.

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Miss New India

A comic novel follows the flight of a young Indian woman from village to metropolis. 

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Embassytown

A heady new novel harks back to the 1970s science fiction of Ursula Le Guin and Doris Lessing.

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Clarence Darrow: American Iconoclast

A legal genius with a penchant for making mischief.

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A Planet of Viruses

The most abundant life form on earth holds surprising secrets about humanity.

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A Day in the Life of a Smiling Woman

Women face life on their own terms in the author's career-spanning story collection.

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A Moment in the Sun

War in the Philippines, gold fever in the Yukon, and an assassin's plot are woven together in a cinematic turn-of-the-century saga.

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The Hollywood Sign

 The history of an icon so entrenched it seems to have grown right out of the hillside.

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The Crimean War: A History

The Victorian conflict that set the stage for the political and military tumult of the 20th century.

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Caleb's Crossing

A colonial girl and a native boy in 17th-century New England are linked by an unusual friendship.

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The Fear

A rare portrait of life—and death—in Robert Mugabe's Zimbabwe.

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April 21: " 'Pull' includes 'invitations to tea' at which one hears smiling reminders that a better life is available to people who stop talking about massacres..."

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.