Displaying articles for: May 2010

Hitch-22

The controversial journalist recalls his formative radicalism and illustrious friendships in an entertaining memoir.

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Chasing the Game

America takes its first steps in the soccer cleats the rest of the world puts on daily. Read more...

Forget Sorrow

A moving graphic memoir of a prominent Chinese family's perilous passage through 20th-century history.

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The Bradshaw Variations

Rachel Cusk's new novel attempts a contemporary reprise of a Tolstoyan melody.

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Contested Will: Who Wrote Shakespeare?

A stimulating exploration of the motives that have driven people to find other authors for Shakespeare's plays.

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The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ

A "so-called believer" explores the argument and art of Philip Pullman's reimagining of gospel narratives.

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Georg Letham: Physician and Murderer

A new look at an Austrian novel that charts a doctor's unique and uncertain path to redemption.

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Fear and Delight: The Fiction of Shirley Jackson

Helen Oyeyemi on why the enigmatic author of "The Lottery" retains her grip on the dark side of our imaginations.

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Role Models

The filmmaker and provocateur transforms a lifetime of fascinations into a memorable and moving set of essays.

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The Finger: A Handbook

A playful and pointed account of the means by which we make our contact with the world around us.

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Cartographies of Time

A fascinating new illustrated history looks at how we visualize the vast territory of the past.

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On Mr. Arkadin and Orson Welles

A Welles scholar offers reflections on the director's vexed legacy, prompted by some recent publications.

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Empires of the Indus

2,000 miles down the Indus with a writer stepping in the literary footsteps of Leigh Fermor and Chatwin.

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Design and Truth

A vision of an ethical design that honestly approaches its environment and endeavors to cooperate with it.

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The Changeling

The latest novel from the 75-year-old Japanese Nobel Prize winner blends mystery and memory.

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The Great Reset and The Rational Optimist

New books by Richard Florida and Matt Ridley that try to put recent economic turbulence in perspective.

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The Pregnant Widow

Martin Amis's new novel remembers the sexual revolution as it was "well into its Reign of Terror phase."

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Ill Fares the Land

A distillation of the historian's career-long engagement with the vicissitude of 20th-century history and ideology.

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The Imperfectionists

A novel mourning the death of journalism, centered on the decline and fall of an English-language paper in Rome.

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War

From the author of The Perfect Storm, a searing report on the reality of the war in Afghanistan's Korengal valley.

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The Lonely Polygamist

A gifted and confident storyteller plots the loneliness of a husband of four and father of 28.

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Operation Mincemeat

The author of Agent Zigzag reveals the true story of Britain's most ingenious WWII espionage ploy.

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Last Call

A scintillating, sweeping, and eye-opening account of the birth, maturity, and afterlife of the 18th Amendment.

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Private Life

The latest novel from Jane Smiley anatomizes a marriage in an era of tumultuous change.

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The Last Stand

The historic battle at Little Bighorn, from the award-winning author of Mayflower.

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April 24: "[The HST] lifted a curtain from our view of the universe, changing it so profoundly that no human can look at the stars in the same way..."

Kenneth Calhoun (Black Moon) and Lysley Tenorio (Monstress) of the Discover Great New Writers program on B-movies, heritage, and finales.

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
In the Light of What We Know

Zia Haider Rahman's mystery of a brilliant Bangladeshi mathematician's past barrels through the Ivy League, London high finance, and spy-haunted Afghanistan in a page-turning tale of exile, intrigue and the price of friendship. A Discover Great New Writers selection.

The People's Platform

Once touted as the foundation for tomorrow's digital democracy, the Internet is increasingly ruled by a few corporate giants, while millions of contributors till its fields for free. Astra Taylor looks at why the web has failed to deliver a communitarian cyberscape, and offers a compelling case for restoring its original vision.

A Private Venus

Dubbed "the Italian Simenon," Giorgio Scerbanenco (1911-1969) began his crime-writing career with books set in the USA, but quickly shifted scene closer to home, the city of Milan.  In this adventure, appearing in English for the first time, his underdog hero Dr. Duca Lamberti finds himself in the middle of a seedy, scantily clad criminal racket, where the presence of an outsider could result in death.