Displaying articles for: March 2009

Humbug

A new collection celebrates the improbable magazine created by a quintet of Mad geniuses. Read more...

1848: The Year of Revolution

In one heady year, the "revolution of the intellectuals" changed the face of Europe -- and left an uncertain legacy. Read more...

The Wilderness

A literary novel that illuminates the universality of ordinary lives. Read more...

The Kindly Ones

In this novel, an SS officer's account of his role in Nazi atrocities blends exhaustive realism and a hallucinatory excess. Read more...

Nothing Right: Short Stories

In this new collection of tales, it's the moments in between the crises that get the attention. Read more...

Gypsy: The Art of the Tease

An attempt to unveil the woman draped in an alluring myth. Read more...

Pandora in the Congo

Unlocking a heart of darkness in colonial Africa yields nested tales in this playful novel. Read more...

1789: The Threshold of the Modern Age

Twelve months that would transform the world -- and define many of the battles of the coming centuries. Read more...

Apocalypse: Four Fresh Steeds

Four new visions of that most irresistable nightmare -- the End of the World. Read more...

Everything Ravaged, Everything Burned

In these stories, a clutch of modern Crusoes carve out lives on islands of their own design. Read more...

The Thoreau You Don't Know

Getting a look at the full Henry. Read more...

The House of Wittgenstein

The story of one of Europe's most talented and unusual families -- unfolded by the scion of another. Read more...

Fatal Lies

A Nietzschean obsession lurks menacingly behind a serene Viennese façade. Read more...

Great Powers: America and the World After Bush

An outline of grand strategy that sees global commerce and armed might on the same spectrum. Read more...

Hard-Boiled Again: the World of Charles Ardai

Leonard Cassuto investigates the literary crime wave masterminded by author and publisher Charles Ardai. Read more...

Brothers

The cheek-by-jowl life of a small Chinese town is the stage for this exuberant tragicomedy. Read more...

Cheever: A Life

A new life of the master of the short story reveals the furies that drove him from within. Read more...

The Believers

A father's illness pulls the rug out from under a family in this novel from the author of What Was She Thinking? Read more...

The Life You Can Save: Acting Now to End World Poverty

The philosopher makes a case for economics of ethics. Read more...

Born to Be Good: The Science of a Meaningful Life

Could altruism and tenderness be the most important of our genetically encoded survival mechanisms? Read more...

The Great Gamble: The Soviet War in Afghanistan

If Afghanistan was the Soviet Union's Vietnam, why did they go in the first place? Read more...

Drood

The lives of Charles Dickens and Wilkie Collins form the foundation for an atmospheric Victorian mystery. Read more...

Stoppard's Chekhov: New Adaptations

The author of the Coast of Utopia turns again to the playwright at the heart of modern drama. Read more...

American Rust

Two boys set off to escape their dying hometown, but a tragic gravity exerts its pull. Read more...

Hans Fallada's Last Stand: Every Man Dies Alone

A novel of German resistance against the Nazis, from the pen of a writer they nearly destroyed. Read more...

Frankly, My Dear: Gone with the Wind Revisited

Gone With the Wind, from page to screen and beyond. Read more...

April 24: "[The HST] lifted a curtain from our view of the universe, changing it so profoundly that no human can look at the stars in the same way..."

Kenneth Calhoun (Black Moon) and Lysley Tenorio (Monstress) of the Discover Great New Writers program on B-movies, heritage, and finales.

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
In the Light of What We Know

Zia Haider Rahman's mystery of a brilliant Bangladeshi mathematician's past barrels through the Ivy League, London high finance, and spy-haunted Afghanistan in a page-turning tale of exile, intrigue and the price of friendship. A Discover Great New Writers selection.

The People's Platform

Once touted as the foundation for tomorrow's digital democracy, the Internet is increasingly ruled by a few corporate giants, while millions of contributors till its fields for free. Astra Taylor looks at why the web has failed to deliver a communitarian cyberscape, and offers a compelling case for restoring its original vision.

A Private Venus

Dubbed "the Italian Simenon," Giorgio Scerbanenco (1911-1969) began his crime-writing career with books set in the USA, but quickly shifted scene closer to home, the city of Milan.  In this adventure, appearing in English for the first time, his underdog hero Dr. Duca Lamberti finds himself in the middle of a seedy, scantily clad criminal racket, where the presence of an outsider could result in death.