Displaying articles for: February 2011

Rodin's Debutante

Ward Just puts his Chicago hometown in perspective with a novel of fathers, sons, and secrets.

Read more...

The Long Road Home

The struggles faced by survivors and refugees of World War II—after the shooting stopped.

Read more...

The Paris Wife

A novel of Ernest Hemingway's wife Hadley among the exiles in 1920s Paris.

Read more...

Music for Silenced Voices

Beauty and dread in the quartets Shostakovich created in Stalin's shadow.

Read more...

When the Killing's Done

A new novel engages the question of animal rights and discovers that humans playing god is not the answer.

Read more...

Ghost Light

The twilight of an actress from the era of Yeats and Synge, from the author of Star of the Sea.

Read more...

My Father's Fortune

An ingenious writer reconfigures his own past.

Read more...

The Oracle of Stamboul

The Ottoman capital is the site of a young woman's discovery of her mysterious, magical destiny.

Read more...

The Hemlock Cup

Socrates's life and work, at home in Athens.

Read more...

Montecore

A rollicking novel of a Tunisian emigrant to Sweden, told in an exuberant remix of languages.

Read more...

The Storyteller of Marrakesh

A tale of truth and lies in a legendary Moroccan square.

Read more...

Life on Sandpaper

An Israeli artist's adventures in the heyday of bohemian Manhattan.

Read more...

Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother

In the cage with the tiger mother: a hard look at the season's most controversial book.

Read more...

The Great Archimedes

The legendary mathematician and his tragic fate.

Read more...

J. D. Salinger: A Life

A new biography plumbs the depths of a literary enigma.

Read more...

The Evolution of Bruno Littlemore

A chimpanzee's tale of sentience, love, and murder.

Read more...

April 17: "In less than three years, both GM and Chrysler would be bankrupt, and a resurgent Ford would wow Wall Street..."

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

advertisement
Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.