Displaying articles for: February 2009

Fool

Can Shakespeare survive the antics of a 21st-century jester? Read more...

The Unforgiving Minute

A young Army officer's life, in training and in action. Read more...

Flannery: A Life of Flannery O'Connor

A life spent "between the house and the chicken yard" nurtured a writer whose short fiction plumbed the depths of the soul. Read more...

The Accordionist's Son

The story of a Basque activist is wrapped in a mediation on translation's pitfalls. Read more...

Three Victories and a Defeat: The Rise and Fall of the First British Empire

A new history argues that British Empire's sun rose not over the colonies, but the Continent. Read more...

Hubert Harrison: The Voice of Harlem Radicalism, 1883-1918

A new biography sheds light on a little-known civil rights pioneer. Read more...

Bright Young People: The Lost Generation of London's Jazz Age

The high spirits and low lights of a celebrated generation. Read more...

The Vagrants

An uncompromising, haunting vision of life in China in the late 1970s. Read more...

Visible Songs: Jazz Icons on DVD

Jazz giants in performance, at the height of their powers. Read more...

The Women

The genius of Taliesin had a genius for romantic torment as well. Read more...

Picturing Langston Hughes

Three new illustrated volumes for children bring an exuberant visuality to the verse of an American master. Read more...

Franz Kafka: The Office Writings

The surprisingly revealing look at the writer's nine-to-five persona. Read more...

In Other Rooms, Other Wonders

The voice of contemporary Pakistan emerges as a polyphonic symphony in this new collection. Read more...

The Associate

A young lawyer, a diabolical conspiracy -- the tools of a past master of the page-turner. Read more...

The Speculator: Four Anthologies

Fresh gatherings of science fiction and fantasy tales prove the short story is alive and well. Read more...

A. Lincoln: A Biography

The obsessive, paradoxical genius of the most revered American president. Read more...

It Seemed Like a Good Idea at the Time: My Adventures in Life and Food

A food writer's memoir of a globe-trotting life. Read more...

Cutting for Stone

Moral medicine. Read more...

Words in Air: The Complete Correspondence between Elizabeth Bishop and Robert Lowell

The correspondence between two great poets yields a portrait of a friendship and a treasure trove of language. Read more...

The Good Parents

She's leaving home. Read more...

April 16: ""Blue pottery vases and bowls for flowers are most attractive, and certain blue books...will repeat and emphasize color."

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.