Displaying articles for: December 2009

Appetite City

A history of eating out in New York city, from the Colonial coffee house to 21st-century “event dining.”

Read more...

Summertime

The Nobel laureate continues to explore the slippery nature of truth in a funny, moving, and deceptive new book. Read more...

Concerning E. M. Forster

One of the most celebrated critics of English literature examines the achievement of the beloved but "enigmatic" novelist. Read more...

20 Books We're Waiting For

James Mustich runs down a score of the coming year's books we're eager to get our hands on.

Read more...

Your Face Tomorrow, Vol. 3: Poison, Shadow, and Farewell

An ambitious novel brings urgent suspense to a philosophical question: how we can know what our words really mean? Read more...

Charles Dickens

The first major biography of the writer in two decades offers a stunningly detailed portrait of a life steeped in words.

Read more...

Gahan Wilson: 50 Years of Playboy Cartoons

A half-century's worth of the cartoonist's exuberant, creepy, and unforgettable creations. Read more...

Gifts for Young Readers

Lisa Von Drasek's third annual "scouting report" provides assistance for the uncertain, the busy, the overwhelmed, with literary gift ideas to please kids of all ages.

Read more...

Yours Ever: People and Their Letters

Thomas Mallon follows up A Book of One's Own with a turn from the privacy of the diary to the fellowship offered by the daily mail. Read more...

Wishing for Yesterday

Our resident children's librarian looks at young readers' classics, redux. Read more...

The Best Books of 2009: Editors' Picks

The editors of the Barnes & Noble Review select their favorite titles of the year -- fiction, nonfiction, and beyond.

Read more...

The Death of Bunny Munro

Amy Benfer on the irrepressible cad on the loose in Nick Cave's novel The Death of Bunny Munro. Read more...

The Man in the Wooden Hat

Jane Gardam's companion novel to Old Filth is not a sequel, but a fresh perspective on a complex relationship. Read more...

April 24: "[The HST] lifted a curtain from our view of the universe, changing it so profoundly that no human can look at the stars in the same way..."

Kenneth Calhoun (Black Moon) and Lysley Tenorio (Monstress) of the Discover Great New Writers program on B-movies, heritage, and finales.

advertisement
Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
In the Light of What We Know

Zia Haider Rahman's mystery of a brilliant Bangladeshi mathematician's past barrels through the Ivy League, London high finance, and spy-haunted Afghanistan in a page-turning tale of exile, intrigue and the price of friendship. A Discover Great New Writers selection.

The People's Platform

Once touted as the foundation for tomorrow's digital democracy, the Internet is increasingly ruled by a few corporate giants, while millions of contributors till its fields for free. Astra Taylor looks at why the web has failed to deliver a communitarian cyberscape, and offers a compelling case for restoring its original vision.

A Private Venus

Dubbed "the Italian Simenon," Giorgio Scerbanenco (1911-1969) began his crime-writing career with books set in the USA, but quickly shifted scene closer to home, the city of Milan.  In this adventure, appearing in English for the first time, his underdog hero Dr. Duca Lamberti finds himself in the middle of a seedy, scantily clad criminal racket, where the presence of an outsider could result in death.