Displaying articles for: December 2009

Appetite City

A history of eating out in New York city, from the Colonial coffee house to 21st-century “event dining.”

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Summertime

The Nobel laureate continues to explore the slippery nature of truth in a funny, moving, and deceptive new book. Read more...

Concerning E. M. Forster

One of the most celebrated critics of English literature examines the achievement of the beloved but "enigmatic" novelist. Read more...

20 Books We're Waiting For

James Mustich runs down a score of the coming year's books we're eager to get our hands on.

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Your Face Tomorrow, Vol. 3: Poison, Shadow, and Farewell

An ambitious novel brings urgent suspense to a philosophical question: how we can know what our words really mean? Read more...

Charles Dickens

The first major biography of the writer in two decades offers a stunningly detailed portrait of a life steeped in words.

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Gahan Wilson: 50 Years of Playboy Cartoons

A half-century's worth of the cartoonist's exuberant, creepy, and unforgettable creations. Read more...

Gifts for Young Readers

Lisa Von Drasek's third annual "scouting report" provides assistance for the uncertain, the busy, the overwhelmed, with literary gift ideas to please kids of all ages.

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Yours Ever: People and Their Letters

Thomas Mallon follows up A Book of One's Own with a turn from the privacy of the diary to the fellowship offered by the daily mail. Read more...

Wishing for Yesterday

Our resident children's librarian looks at young readers' classics, redux. Read more...

The Best Books of 2009: Editors' Picks

The editors of the Barnes & Noble Review select their favorite titles of the year -- fiction, nonfiction, and beyond.

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The Death of Bunny Munro

Amy Benfer on the irrepressible cad on the loose in Nick Cave's novel The Death of Bunny Munro. Read more...

The Man in the Wooden Hat

Jane Gardam's companion novel to Old Filth is not a sequel, but a fresh perspective on a complex relationship. Read more...

April 19: "What you see first, after the starting gun's crack, is a column of bobbing runners, thousands of them, surging downhill..."

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

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Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.