Displaying articles for: December 2007

Sex, Debt, and Revenge: Balzac's Cousin Bette

Novelist Min Jin Lee on Balzac's masterful tale of obsession, Cousin Bette. Read more...

The Year's Best Reading (Part Two)

Our contributors select the most memorable reading of 2007 -- both contemporary and classic (Part Two of Two). Read more...

The Year's Best Reading

Our contributors select the most memorable reading of 2007 -- both contemporary and classic (Part One of Two). Read more...

The Letters of E. B. White

The life and work of the cherished stylist, illuminated by his correspondence. Read more...

The New York Stories of Edith Wharton

The New York Stories of Edith Wharton Read more...

Location, Location, Location

Two new books explore the vast domain of mapmakers. Read more...

The Melancholy Fate of Capt. Lewis

The famous -- and troubled -- explorer of the West, seen through the eyes of a teacher obsessed with his legacy. Read more...

American Visionary

A new box set captures the versatile director John Ford coming of age as a film giant. Read more...

Picture Gallery: Art Books of the Year

From the beauty of nature's architecture to the innovations of a fashion genius, a cornucopia of visual delights. Read more...

Rhett Butler's People

A new sequel to Gone with the Wind offers an updated version of the Civil War saga-- and of Margaret Mitchell's enigmatic antihero. Read more...

The Gift: Art, Imagination, and the Power of the Creative Spirit

A classic analysis of creativity, culture, and the idea of property returns in a new edition. Read more...

Books for Kids: A Scouting Report

A librarian offers guidance on child-pleasing selections for every age. Read more...

Alice: Alice Roosevelt Longworth, from White House Princess to Washington Power Broker

The life of a president's daughter and political gadfly. Read more...

What Orwell Didn't Know: Propaganda and the New Face of American Politics

A new collection of essays revisits Orwell's classic warning about the misuse of language. Read more...

Someday This Pain Will Be Useful to You

Dry wit and dreams of the wide-open prairie are coping strategies in Peter Cameron's new coming-of-age tale. Read more...

The Paris Review Interviews, Volume II

A new volume of conversations with writers from Faulkner to Franzen. Read more...

What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815-1848

A sweeping new history of America in the age of Andrew Jackson and "manifest destiny." Read more...

Valley Boy: The Education of Tom Perkins

A tech-industry mogul shares (some of) the details of life as a billionaire.
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Free for All: Oddballs, Geeks, and Gangstas in the Public Library

A librarian chronicles the anything-but-peaceful scene at the circulation desk. Read more...

Beethoven Was One-Sixteenth Black: and Other Stories

New stories from the Nobel laureate and longtime student of the human comedy. Read more...

Have Gun, Will Travel

Sarah Weinman finds that death rather frequently takes a holiday -- or at least maintains a second home in Venice. Read more...

In Europe: Travels through the Twentieth Century

A journalist's European odyssey unlocks the shadowy history of the 20th century. Read more...

April 19: "What you see first, after the starting gun's crack, is a column of bobbing runners, thousands of them, surging downhill..."

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.