Displaying articles for: November 2012

The Editors' Picks: The Best Fiction of 2012

A dozen of our personal favorites from a year in reading fiction.

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The Editors' Picks: The Best Nonfiction of 2012

A dozen of our personal favorites from a year in reading nonfiction.

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Consider the Fork

The ways in which kitchen tools and techniques affect what and how we eat.

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Cézanne: A Life

The revolutionary painter, in the eyes of his contemporaries, was by turns a genius and simpleton.

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Hallucinations

The world inside can seem realer than any other.

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This Land Is Their Land

New lives of folk music legends Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger.

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Elsewhere: A Memoir

A novelist reveals the real-life inspiration for his hard-luck fiction.

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The Fun Stuff

The "closest reader of our time" sets his sights on everything from Keith Moon's drumming to Paul Auster's prose.

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Reinventing Bach

Following Bach's music into the digital age and beyond.

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Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power

A deeply sympathetic examination of the Founding Father's paradoxes.

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Iron Curtain

When the menace of Stalinism knew no borders.

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Nice Shots and Great Shots: Reading the National Book Award Fiction Finalists

A former National Book Award judge casts an eye over this year's contenders.

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Magnificence

A mansion-full of stuffed beasts provides a haunting setting for a novel of secrets and consequences.

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Kurt Vonnegut: Letters

The novelist's correspondence shows a determinedly independent sensibility working patiently at becoming a legend.

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April 19: "What you see first, after the starting gun's crack, is a column of bobbing runners, thousands of them, surging downhill..."

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.