Displaying articles for: November 2009

The Talented Miss Highsmith

The life of one of the greatest of crime writers was as darkly shadowed as any of her creations. Read more...

Open

Can an athlete whose dazzling feats and outsize persona create a memoir that escapes the gravitational pull of his fame? Read more...

Eating: A Memoir

A lion of the publishing world on a life lived as much for the pleasures of the table as of the text. Read more...

Reading in the Brain

What you're doing with your eyes and brain right now is a lot more interesting than you realize. Read more...

Devil's Dream

The author of All Souls Rising bases his latest novel on the Civil War career of one of the Confederacy's most controversial figures. Read more...

The War That Killed Achilles

Caroline Alexander journeys back to the mother of all battles. Read more...

Too Much Happiness: Stories

One of the defining creators of contemporary short fiction suggests she has new territories in sight. Read more...

Changing My Mind

A wide-ranging collection of essays on topics that range from the nature of British comedy to the orations of Barack Obama. Read more...

The Original of Laura

The wizard of fiction's unfinished novel is published, and the Vladimir Nabokov's magic cabinet is unlocked for our perusal. Read more...

Sentencing the Suspects

Former National Book Award judge Tom LeClair takes a close look at this year’s fiction finalists. Read more...

Invisible

Veronique de Turenne explores the novelist's ambitious Invisible. Read more...

American Original

The remarkable career of Supreme Court justice Antonin Scalia. Read more...

The Lacuna

A adventures of a Zelig-like figure are the center of the new novel from the author of The Poisonwood Bible. Read more...

City Boy: My Life in New York During the 1960s and '70s

A brash, revealing, and sometimes dishy chronicle of a gay writer's life in a bygone Manhattan. Read more...

Under the Dome

A town's mysterious encapsulation yields a nightmarish turn toward the brutal. Read more...

D-Day

"As the ramp went down we were getting direct fire right into our craft," wrote a soldier in the 116th on the western part of Omaha. "My three squad leaders in front and others were hit. Some men climbed over the side. Two sailors got hit." Read more...

Lit

The new memoir from the author of The Liars' Club charts life as an addict, poet, and survivor. Read more...

Googled

Do we really need another book about Google? Read more...

Super Freakonomics

Ezra Klein measures a sequel’s unintended consequences. Read more...

Cowboys Full

How a deck of cards gave birth to a legendary pastime that has come to stand for part of the American character. Read more...

The Humbling

An actor prepares for his climactic appearance. Read more...

April 17: "In less than three years, both GM and Chrysler would be bankrupt, and a resurgent Ford would wow Wall Street..."

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

advertisement
Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.