Displaying articles for: October 2012

Back to Blood

A wryly observant take on twenty-first-century America through the life of one of its most colorful cities.

 

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Glittering Images

Celebrating great works of art in a state of hyper-articulate ecstasy.

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Spillover

When animal infections make the jump to human hosts.

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When America First Met China

The beginning of a complex relationship.

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My American Revolution

Can the ghost of 1776 be discerned in the highway-striped landscape of a twenty-first-century nation?

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Six Months in 1945

How the powers that had lined up against the Axis shifted positions to begin a chilly new conflict.

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Greatest Generation

Two defining voices of rock look back on lives of creative musical destruction.

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The Big Screen

From the earliest moving images to the latest blockbusters, a history of our shared love affair with the movies.

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It's Fine By Me

The acclaimed Norwegian novelist captures the angst of youth and evokes the work of Raymond Carver.

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There Was a Country: A Personal History of Biafra

A record of conflict viewed through the lens of one author's life.

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The Scientists: A Family Romance

Unearthing family secrets while resisting the impulse to curry sympathy or self-mythologize.

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May We Be Forgiven

A sprawling aesthetic jumble of a novel finds a unified voice.

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Building Stories

An ambitious graphic novel documents the life of a nameless Chicago woman.

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The Voice Is All

Jack Kerouac's journey to the composition of On the Road was long, and filled with detours.

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Makers: The New Industrial Revolution

3-D printers and the future of manufacturing.

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April 19: "What you see first, after the starting gun's crack, is a column of bobbing runners, thousands of them, surging downhill..."

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.