Displaying articles for: October 2009

The Casebook of Victor Frankenstein

Mary Shelley's most famous creation mingles with his maker and her circle. Read more...

Traveling with Pomegranates

The author of The Secret Life of Bees and her daughter pen an unusual memoir of travel and self-discovery. Read more...

Box 21

A tale of human trafficking and revenge, seen through multiple perspectives. Read more...

Parallel Play

A childhood seen through the high-precision lens of Asperger's syndrome. Read more...

The Tyranny of E-Mail

The editor of Granta looks at messages from Morse to Microsoft Outlook -- and sees the rise of an implacable electronic tide threatens to overwhelm us. Read more...

War Dances

A new collection of longer and shorter works from the award-winning novelist and poet trades in heartfelt sorrow and wicked humor. Read more...

The Music Room

A boy's life in a famed Tudor castle -- haunted by spirits of the past, and the present. Read more...

An Artist in Treason

The youngest general in the Continental Army was also an inventive schemer who nearly engineered the breakup of the fledgling Union. Read more...

Only the Super-Rich Can Save Us!

Ralph Nader's public-policy fantasia pits noble tycoons against mega-corporations in what the author calls a "practical utopia." Read more...

Robert Altman: The Oral Biography

A portrait of the auteur, through the lens of conversation. Read more...

Blame

A murderous accident is the departure for one woman’s surprising journey to something like redemption. Read more...

Infection by Volume

A reading list that may form a textual inoculation for viral anxiety.

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Chronic City

The author of Motherless Brooklyn and The Fortress of Solitude imagines a Manhattan nearly replaced by its own simulacrum. Read more...

The Education of a British-Protected Child

The author of the classic Things Fall Apart uses his pen to set a cat among the pigeons. Read more...

Memories of the Future

Short stories as dreams with barbs, from a satirist of Soviet life under Stalin. Read more...

The Children's Book

In A. S. Byatt’s new novel, the Edwardian era is both disappearing Eden and the center of turmoil for one artistic family. Read more...

Bicycle Diaries

When David Byrne stops moving, does he fall over? And when stationary, is he liable to be found leaning carefully against a wall? Read more...

Wolf Hall

Hilary Mantel brings the intrigue of the Tudor court to life -- through the mind of one of its most elusive players. Read more...

The Clinton Tapes: Wrestling History with the President

Richard Pious listens in as President Clinton wrangles with speeches, maneuvers foreign powers, and faces catastrophe. Read more...

The Immortals

The complex rhythms of the raga pulse through a Jamesian rendering of Bombay. Read more...

Generosity: An Enhancement

Scientists and scribes pursue happiness in the new novel from the author of Galatea 2.2. Read more...

April 21: " 'Pull' includes 'invitations to tea' at which one hears smiling reminders that a better life is available to people who stop talking about massacres..."

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.