Displaying articles for: January 2011

Harlem is Nowhere

Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts offers a stirring exploration of the urban mecca's geography, actual and imagined. Adam Bradley reviews.

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Punching Out

Taking apart an auto plant, after the last workers have been let go.

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You Know When the Men Are Gone

The wives at a military base grapple with the unknown as their husbands head into combat in these linked short stories.

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Being Polite to Hitler

The story of an ordinary woman, a younger man, and the strictures of small-town life.

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The Death Instinct

A deadly bomber struck Wall Street in 1920, and the case was never solved. Jed Rubenfeld's historical thriller revisits the scene.

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I Love a Broad Margin to My Life

The author of The Woman Warrior savors each "scrap of moment" in this fiery memoir.

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Night Soul and Other Stories

A new volume of stories from Joseph McElroy leads readers from darkness to sudden radiance.

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Marshalling Justice

A matchless champion of civil rights emerges from the early letters of Thurgood Marshall.

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Destiny and Desire

In his new novel, Carlos Fuentes portrays Mexico in an age when power may have transcended politics.

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Decade

A new compilation seeks to pack the first ten years of the 21st century into a single volume of images from around the world.

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Clara and Mr. Tiffany

Passion—artistic and otherwise—comes to light in the workshop of the legendary glassmaker Louis Comfort Tiffany.

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The Lake of Dreams

In the new novel from the author of The Memory Keeper's Daughter, a contemporary connects with a female ancestor, erased from the family record.

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Bird Cloud

A natural and domestic history of an author's love affair with a rugged corner of Wyoming.

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Buzz: The Life and Art of Busby Berkeley

A new life of one of the great masters of Hollywood spectacle, a restless and reckless pursuer of excess.

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Which "Aesthetics" Do You Mean?

Leonard Koren offers a uniquely personal take on the question of what defines the beautiful.

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April 21: " 'Pull' includes 'invitations to tea' at which one hears smiling reminders that a better life is available to people who stop talking about massacres..."

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.