Displaying articles for: January 2010

The Godfather of Kathmandu

As detective Sonchai Jitpleecheep crosses the border into Nepal, the karmic burdens weighing on Bangkok’s most honest cop get even heavier.

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Point Omega

The author of Underworld and Falling Man ensnares readers in another "imaginative act of empathy" and leaves us "suspended in its drama of time."

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Tracking the True Roberto Bolaño

Last interviews and an early novel from the author of The Savage Detectives and 2666.

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Ordinary Thunderstorms

A single mistake sets of a hurricane of consequences, battering a hapless climate scientist in this darkly comic, Dickensian tale.

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I.O.U: Why Everyone Owes Everyone And No One Can Pay

How we drove the world's economy right off the road.

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Sleepless

In Charlie Huston’s surreal new thriller, zombie-like Los Angelenos find themselves up all night.

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Remarkable Creatures

In this novel of scientific discovery in Regency England, the human specimens are the most unusual.

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Just Kids

Patti Smith and Robert Mapplethorpe, and a passionate friendship that rocked the music and art worlds. Read more...

The Unnamed

In the new novel from the author of Then We Came to the End, a dramatic and surprising combat between the flesh and the spirit.

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Doors Open

An art-heist in the heart of Edinburgh takes a wrong turn in this darkly comic caper. Read more...

The Ticking Is the Bomb

In an act of daring juxtaposition, the award-winning poet and memoirist meditates on the arrival of his child in a world shadowed by torture.

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36 Arguments for the Existence of God

Philosophy, religion, science, madness and love are all on the menu in this richly imagined novel of ideas.

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You Are Not a Gadget

A founding eminence of cyberspace inveighs against the digitization of culture. Read more...

The Swan Thieves

The new novel by the author of The Historian turns away from vampires to obsessions of more mortal flesh.

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Ransom

One of Australia’s most celebrated writers turns back to a chilling episode out of Homer: the rage of Achilles, and the terrible fate of Hector.

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Daring Young Men

The Berlin Airlift was supposed to be a stopgap measure until a diplomatic stalemate could be resolved. It became a pivotal victory in the Cold War. Read more...

Noah's Compass

A mysterious assault provokes a reassessment from a man who had resigned himself to a second-rate life. Read more...

Committed

The author of Eat, Pray, Love traces her circuitous route back to the altar. Read more...

April 18: "[W]ould it be too bold to imagine that all warm-blooded animals have arisen from one living filament…?"

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.