Displaying articles for: January 2009

The King of Madison Avenue: David Ogilvy and the Making of Modern Advertising

The life of the original Mad Man. Read more...

The First Person and Other Stories

A collection of short fiction that explores the unsettling consequences of the tales we tell ourselves. Read more...

Somewhere Towards the End

A writer's painstaking account of her recent life, under the shadow of its end. Read more...

Chesterton and the Romance of Orthodoxy: The Making of GKC 1874-1908

A new biography of the unique essayist, fabulist, and spiritual thinker. Read more...

Angels and Ages: A Short Book about Darwin, Lincoln, and Modern Life

An exploration of the parallel careers of two nineteenth-century titans. Read more...

Snark: It's Mean, It's Personal, and It's Ruining Our Conversation

A manifesto that combines a history of malicious wit with a critique of culture in the age of the blog. Read more...

Invisible Hands: The Making of the Conservative Movement from the New Deal to Reagan

The boardroom strategists who made "conservatism" a political watchword. Read more...

Rimbaud: The Double Life of a Rebel

The poet who abandoned his verse -- and left behind a legacy that still haunts readers. Read more...

The Inheritance: The World Obama Confronts and the Challenges to American Power

The challenges facing the Obama administration. Read more...

Sing Them Home

A tale of children orphaned by mother nature, from the author of Broken for You. Read more...

William Hazlitt: The First Modern Man

Christopher Byrd on a new life of the romantic iconoclast. Read more...

Things I've Been Silent About: Memories

The author of Reading Lolita in Tehran looks back at her homeland, through the lens of her youth. Read more...

Khan al-Khalili

A love triangle in wartime, from the author of the Cairo Trilogy. Read more...

Disquiet

In this family story, homecoming and tragedy are intertwined. Read more...

Banquet at Delmonico's: Great Minds, the Gilded Age, and the Triumph of Evolution in America

The men who made Darwin, evolution and "survival of the fittest" the topic of a new century. Read more...

Land of Marvels

Power struggles both great and small contaminate the excavation of an ancient Mesopotamian site in the latest from the author of Sacred Hunger. Read more...

Death Between the Wars: Historical Mysteries Part IV

The final installment in our murderous tour of historical mystery and crime fiction. Read more...

The Liberal Hour: The 1960s and the Remaking of American Life

Did a set of arcane procedural changes upend decades of American political stasis? Read more...

The City and the Mountains

A sly and savage take on the world of fashionable hedonism. Read more...

Shakespeare and Modern Culture

The most revered writer in English may understand us better than we do him. Read more...

Rancid Pansies

Samper Fidelis -- Gerald Samper has finally decided to his own self be true. Read more...

Nothing to Fear: FDR's Inner Circle and the Hundred Days that Created Modern America

Revisiting the magnitude of the crisis FDR faced can be both inspiring and overwhelming. Read more...

Esther's Inheritance

The Hungarian novelist portrays an heiress facing a collapsing way of life in this newly translated work Read more...

Bone by Bone

An army investigator revisits a childhood trauma as new questions arise about his brother's disappearance. Read more...

April 18: "[W]ould it be too bold to imagine that all warm-blooded animals have arisen from one living filament…?"

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

advertisement
Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.