Displaying articles for: January 2008

Swimming in a Sea of Death

Journalist and author David Rieff writes a memoir -- and a memorial -- of his mother, Susan Sontag. Read more...

The Senator's Wife

The gulf between lives shadows a story of a friendship and two uncertain marriages. Read more...

The Pirate's Dilemma

A music magazine editor and DJ argues for the social benefit of illegal downloads. Read more...

Life Class

The celebrated author of the Regeneration Trilogy returns to the trauma of World War I, on and off the battlefield. Read more...

Day

The author of Paradise tracks the life of an RAF sergeant in the wake of World War Two. Read more...

Gods Behaving Badly

The Olympian deities find themselves down and out in London. Read more...

To Conquer Hell: The Meuse-Argonne, 1918

A unsparing portrait of one of the 20th century's most dreadful military clashes. Read more...

Freedom for the Thought That We Hate: Tales of the First Amendment

The Pulitzer-winning author argues for the vital importance of the First Amendment. Read more...

Children's Books: The Envelope, Please

Lisa Von Drasek on this year's prizes. Read more...

In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto

The author of The Omnivore's Dilemma offers his take on diet, nutrition, and health in the 21st century. Read more...

Someone Knows My Name

An African girl's 18th-century odyssey, into (and out of) bondage in the New World. Read more...

William Maxwell: Early Novels and Stories

A new collection of early fiction from a writer focused on the heart. Read more...

Entering Hades: The Double Life of a Serial Killer

A killer turns journalist -- and covers the story of his own crimes. Read more...

Riding Toward Everywhere

The award-winning writer hops the rails for a boxcar-framed view of America. Read more...

The Fall of the House of Bush

The author of House of Bush, House of Saud turns in another critical look at the current administration. Read more...

The Spies Come Out of the Cold: New Espionage Fiction

Spy novels for the 21st century. Read more...

Darkmans

The past and present collide in a tale haunted by a sinister presence. Read more...

Words on the Way: Winter Reading for 2008

A preview of coming attractions in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Read more...

A More Perfect Constitution

A political scientist offers a program for renovating America's legal foundation. Read more...

Love Falls

A Tuscan idyll provides the stage for a teenage girl's entry into the mysteries of adulthood. Read more...

The Telephone Gambit: Chasing Alexander Graham Bell's Secret

So, you think you know who invented the telephone? Read more...

Diary of a Bad Year

The new novel from the Nobel laureate balances traditional narrative and radical innovation. Read more...

Gang Leader for a Day: A Rogue Sociologist Takes to the Streets

A memoir of research and risk taking amid a group of Chicago drug dealers. Read more...

Laura Warholic, or, The Sexual Intellectual

The first novel in nearly two decades from a celebrated literary innovator follows a magazine writer's peculiar obsessions. Read more...

People of the Book

A centuries-old Haggadah provides the linchpin for Geraldine Brooks's sweeping new novel. Read more...

April 24: "[The HST] lifted a curtain from our view of the universe, changing it so profoundly that no human can look at the stars in the same way..."

Kenneth Calhoun (Black Moon) and Lysley Tenorio (Monstress) of the Discover Great New Writers program on B-movies, heritage, and finales.

advertisement
Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
In the Light of What We Know

Zia Haider Rahman's mystery of a brilliant Bangladeshi mathematician's past barrels through the Ivy League, London high finance, and spy-haunted Afghanistan in a page-turning tale of exile, intrigue and the price of friendship. A Discover Great New Writers selection.

The People's Platform

Once touted as the foundation for tomorrow's digital democracy, the Internet is increasingly ruled by a few corporate giants, while millions of contributors till its fields for free. Astra Taylor looks at why the web has failed to deliver a communitarian cyberscape, and offers a compelling case for restoring its original vision.

A Private Venus

Dubbed "the Italian Simenon," Giorgio Scerbanenco (1911-1969) began his crime-writing career with books set in the USA, but quickly shifted scene closer to home, the city of Milan.  In this adventure, appearing in English for the first time, his underdog hero Dr. Duca Lamberti finds himself in the middle of a seedy, scantily clad criminal racket, where the presence of an outsider could result in death.