Displaying articles for: August 2013

Love Rocks: Bright Lights, Big City Romance

I grew up in a small town with Colonial and Victorian era houses and big trees shading the quiet streets.  It was almost picture-perfect, with steepled churches and a town library modelled on a miniature Monticello. But underneath that near-immaculate exterior lurked…well, nothing very sinister.  No Stephen King monsters or cults of Stepford Wives. It was and still is a pretty nice place to live; neighbors look out for neighbors and residents actually care enough about the place to show up to town hall meetings.

 

That sort of lifestyle is the basis for small town contemporary romance. For many readers, the notion of life in a peaceful, unhurried setting, where neighbor knows neighbor, holds enormous appeal.  In fact, small town romance is so dominant these days that it seems difficult to find contemporary romances with a big city setting.

 

More Than a Kiss by Stacey Joy Netzel starts with a kiss, one that comes with strings attached—to a handsome and rich LA entrepreneur. 

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April 24: "[The HST] lifted a curtain from our view of the universe, changing it so profoundly that no human can look at the stars in the same way..."

Kenneth Calhoun (Black Moon) and Lysley Tenorio (Monstress) of the Discover Great New Writers program on B-movies, heritage, and finales.

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
In the Light of What We Know

Zia Haider Rahman's mystery of a brilliant Bangladeshi mathematician's past barrels through the Ivy League, London high finance, and spy-haunted Afghanistan in a page-turning tale of exile, intrigue and the price of friendship. A Discover Great New Writers selection.

The People's Platform

Once touted as the foundation for tomorrow's digital democracy, the Internet is increasingly ruled by a few corporate giants, while millions of contributors till its fields for free. Astra Taylor looks at why the web has failed to deliver a communitarian cyberscape, and offers a compelling case for restoring its original vision.

A Private Venus

Dubbed "the Italian Simenon," Giorgio Scerbanenco (1911-1969) began his crime-writing career with books set in the USA, but quickly shifted scene closer to home, the city of Milan.  In this adventure, appearing in English for the first time, his underdog hero Dr. Duca Lamberti finds himself in the middle of a seedy, scantily clad criminal racket, where the presence of an outsider could result in death.