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Robert W. Chambers: Sentimental Horrification

An inspiration behind HBO's True Detective brings the horrors and earthly delights of the nineteenth century's roaring conclusion.

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The Philip Trent Mysteries

Why three lost tales of an amateur sleuth are among the best detective stories ever written.

 

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Wintry Mix

An inviting pile of season's readings -- magical, mysterious, and mirthful.

 

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The Ghost Stories of Edith Wharton

The great chronicler of turn-of-the-century New York was also a master of the chilling tale.

 

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The Riddle of the Sands

Why this 1903 "Record of Secret Service" may be the first great modern spy novel.

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Jean-Claude Izzo: Noir under the Sun

Hot nights and cold Cassis with Marseilles' master of crime fiction.

 

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Evan S. Connell: Bridging the Islands

The late author was an artist unconstrained by genre or convention.

 

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A Duckburg Holiday

How Carl Barks made Uncle Scrooge McDuck the center of a magical, web-footed world.

 

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Religio Medici and Urne-Burial

The haunting imagination and musical prose of a seventeenth-century physician.

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Mediterranean Breeze

Norman Douglas's classic novel of an Italian island makes for hilarious and "utterly pagan" beach reading.

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Diamond in the Roughneck: The Books of Harry Crews

The lasting impact of a writer committed to the "jagged edges" of the soul.

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Stranger Magic: Charmed States and the Arabian Nights

How the stories of Scheherazade invented fantasy.

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A Dreamer of Mars: Edgar Rice Burroughs and John Carter

How a failed salesman became a titan of planetary romance.

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"We Revel in a Crowd of Any Kind": Dickens the Journalist

The great novelist, in love with the life of the streets.

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Arabian Sands

A classic epic of endurance is also a testament to the beauty and hardship of desert life.

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When the World Spoke French

A captivating history of an era in which the gaze of the world was fixed on Paris.

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James Lees-Milne

The life, times, and seductions of James Lees-Milne (1908-1997), England's greatest 20th-century diarist.

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A Reader on Reading

A collection of essays on a reading life from the author of A History of Reading and The Library at Night

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About the Columnist
Michael Dirda is a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The Washington Post Book World. He is the author of the memoir An Open Book and several collections of essays. His most recent book is Classics for Pleasure.

April 24: "[The HST] lifted a curtain from our view of the universe, changing it so profoundly that no human can look at the stars in the same way..."

Kenneth Calhoun (Black Moon) and Lysley Tenorio (Monstress) of the Discover Great New Writers program on B-movies, heritage, and finales.

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
In the Light of What We Know

Zia Haider Rahman's mystery of a brilliant Bangladeshi mathematician's past barrels through the Ivy League, London high finance, and spy-haunted Afghanistan in a page-turning tale of exile, intrigue and the price of friendship. A Discover Great New Writers selection.

The People's Platform

Once touted as the foundation for tomorrow's digital democracy, the Internet is increasingly ruled by a few corporate giants, while millions of contributors till its fields for free. Astra Taylor looks at why the web has failed to deliver a communitarian cyberscape, and offers a compelling case for restoring its original vision.

A Private Venus

Dubbed "the Italian Simenon," Giorgio Scerbanenco (1911-1969) began his crime-writing career with books set in the USA, but quickly shifted scene closer to home, the city of Milan.  In this adventure, appearing in English for the first time, his underdog hero Dr. Duca Lamberti finds himself in the middle of a seedy, scantily clad criminal racket, where the presence of an outsider could result in death.