Displaying articles for: December 2013

Centaur Style: Clive Thompson on Smarter Than You Think

The strangest thing about the explosion of new technology might be the fact that we've been here before. 

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Gene Wolfe: No Comparison

A Grandmaster of Science Fiction offers his favorite folktale, and thoughts about the roots of his work.

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My Mistake: Daniel Menaker on What "Nobody Knows"

A legendary editor unveils life inside publishing and The New Yorker.

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Across the Great Divide: John Ferling on Jefferson and Hamilton

A master historian on what a bitter feud between two Founding Fathers can teach us about our own volatile era in politics.

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Michael Connelly: The Gods of Guilt

The creator of Harry Bosch and Mickey Haller on jazz, comparing American mystery writers to Scandinavian ones, and how crime novels report from society's front lines.

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The Voice: Tracey Thorn's Pop Journey

Musician Tracey Thorn on punk rock, feminism, motherhood, the radical sound of quiet, and her new memoir, Bedsit Disco Queen.

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April 24: "[The HST] lifted a curtain from our view of the universe, changing it so profoundly that no human can look at the stars in the same way..."

Kenneth Calhoun (Black Moon) and Lysley Tenorio (Monstress) of the Discover Great New Writers program on B-movies, heritage, and finales.

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
In the Light of What We Know

Zia Haider Rahman's mystery of a brilliant Bangladeshi mathematician's past barrels through the Ivy League, London high finance, and spy-haunted Afghanistan in a page-turning tale of exile, intrigue and the price of friendship. A Discover Great New Writers selection.

The People's Platform

Once touted as the foundation for tomorrow's digital democracy, the Internet is increasingly ruled by a few corporate giants, while millions of contributors till its fields for free. Astra Taylor looks at why the web has failed to deliver a communitarian cyberscape, and offers a compelling case for restoring its original vision.

A Private Venus

Dubbed "the Italian Simenon," Giorgio Scerbanenco (1911-1969) began his crime-writing career with books set in the USA, but quickly shifted scene closer to home, the city of Milan.  In this adventure, appearing in English for the first time, his underdog hero Dr. Duca Lamberti finds himself in the middle of a seedy, scantily clad criminal racket, where the presence of an outsider could result in death.