• Q&A

"The Way We Choose to Cook Will Also Determine How We Live."

Bee Wilson, author of Dsicover Great New Writers Holiday 2012 pick Consider the Fork, discusses the "single greatest improvement ever to occur in kitchen technology," the one item cooks tell her they really love, and the graphic novel her teenage son convinced her to read, among many other things, with Discover Great New Writers.

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  • Q&A

"This Name Was the Signpost"

Joe Mozingo reveals his family's incredible -- and very American -- story in his memoir, The Fiddler on Pantico Run. Here, he discusses his "funny last name," the legacies of race, and how his family's own lost history speaks to us all, among other things, with Discover Great New Writers.

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  • Q&A

>You Are Standing in a Dark Cave

Robin Sloan, author of Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore and Charles Yu, author of Sorry Please Thank You, talk about first-person vs. third-person narration, How Fiction Works by James Wood, and creating entirely new worlds with text, among other things.

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  • Q&A

"A Squint Into the Future"

Laurie Halse Anderson, the bestselling author of Speak (a National Book Award Finalist and Edgar Allan Poe Award Finalist) talks with Karen Hesse, MacArthur "Genius" Fellow  and author of Safekeeping, a haunting look at a near-future America with chilling overtones of a political dystopia.

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  • Q&A

From "Juicy" to "Beasts": A Conversation with Lucy Alibar

In an exclusive interview, playwright Lucy Alibar, who adapted the script of art house favorite Beasts of the Southern Wild from her one-act play Juicy and Delicious, talks about the gender of her main character, future plans for her play, and authors she admires.

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  • Q&A

"Stories Are Far More Important Than Possessions": A Conversation with Edmund de Waal

Edmund de Waal, author of The Hare with Amber Eyes, a Fall 2010 Discover Great New Writers selection, discusses connecting with readers, Proust, and the "odd correspondence between inheriting a story and inheriting an object."

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  • Q&A

"He's someone who will sacrifice every shred of his own dignity in an attempt to preserve it."

Maggie Shipstead, the author of Seating Arrangments, our newest B&N Recommends selection, discusses class-conscious WASPs, literary influences from Cheever to Perotta, and exploding whales.

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  • Q&A

A Conversation with Rajesh Parameswaran

In an exclusive Q&A, Rajesh Parameswaran, the author of the Summer 2012 Discover Great New Writers selection I Am an Executioner, talks about the ideas, books, and writers who influenced his dazzling, often outrageous stories about appearances, power, and love.

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  • Q&A

A Conversation with Cheryl Strayed

The work of the late poet Adrienne Rich was an important part of Cheryl Strayed's trek along the Pacific Coast Trail, chronicled in her riveting new memoir, Wild. When Discover Great New Writers asked the author to talk about her book and her journey, she told us, "I've always loved books. But the books I took with me on my PCT hike were even more important because they were often my only companions. Some  I chose because I'd always heard I should read them -- books like Faulkner's As I Lay Dying and Nabokov's Lolita fall in to that category -- others I chose because I'd already read and loved them, such as Adrienne Rich's The Dream of Common Language, which is something of a sacred text in Wild."

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April 19: "What you see first, after the starting gun's crack, is a column of bobbing runners, thousands of them, surging downhill..."

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.