Displaying articles for: September 2009

Elmore Leonard Honored by PEN

We're delighted to learn, courtesy of the New York Times, that PEN USA has announced that it will be bestowing its Lifetime Achievement Award upon Elmore Leonard at a ceremony to be held in Beverly Hills in early December. Read more...

Maud Newton wins Narrative Prize

We're pleased to note that B&N Review contributor Maud Newton has been awarded Narrative's annual prize for work from an emerging writer. Read more...

Lightning Round

Check out one of our favorite videos from the National Book Award-anniversary celebration: Harold Augenbraum's literary criticism at Twitter Speed! Read more...

Photos from the Elephant House

For the dedicated Edward Gorey fanatic, check out this collection of "still photos and publicity images for Christopher Seufert's upcoming documentary project about the late illustrator Edward Gorey. Shot with him between 1996 and his death in April, 2000." Read more...

Wonderful news

In the midst of last week's launch of our redesigned site, I missed one bit of welcome news -- Richard Holmes's The Age of Wonder was awarded the Royal Society Prize for Science Books.

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The Best of the National Book Awards

To celebrate the 60th Anniversary of the National Book Awards, the National Book Foundation announced a campaign to select the Best of the National Book Awards Fiction. We're taking part with an exclusive series of video conversations about the six finalists, plus fascinating essays about each of the fiction award winners -- from 1950 to now. Read more...

Terms and Conditions

This statement of the terms of service of The Book is derived from principles of the public sphere, covered in the U.N. Declaration of Human Rights, the American Declaration of Independence, the Magna Carta, the Golden Rule, and the Bhagavad Gita, as well as the works of Virginia Woolf, Friedrich Nietzsche, Booker T. Washington, Emily Dickinson, Karl Marx, Thomas Carlyle, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Thomas Paine, Mary Shelley, John Locke, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Voltaire, the Marquis de Sade, John Milton, Michel de Montaigne, Erasmus, Francis Bacon, Martin Luther, Thomas Aquinas, Maimonides, Hypatia, Augustine, Aristotle, and Plato, among other pursuant documents not exclusive of other acts and agreements past, present, and future. Read more...

Puzzling

It feels like that wooden jigsaw I left unfinished in Maine in August has been haunting me. I’m seeing puzzles everywhere, even in books. First, there’s the invention of mass-produced cardboard puzzles in Betsy Carter’s novel about Jewish immigrants who escape Germany for New York during the 1930s. Drawing on her own family’s trials, tribulations, and triumphs, Carter has written an absorbing historical saga, in which the title character’s brainstorm plays a consequential role... Read more...

Welcome

Welcome to the new Barnes & Noble Review. We’re glad to celebrate our second anniversary with a refreshed design and a number of added functions and features... Read more...

Two years and 1300 books later...

You're not suffering from monitor malfunction. To celebrate our second anniversary, we've given the Barnes & Noble Review a slight facelift. Read more...

April 24: "[The HST] lifted a curtain from our view of the universe, changing it so profoundly that no human can look at the stars in the same way..."

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
In the Light of What We Know

Zia Haider Rahman's mystery of a brilliant Bangladeshi mathematician's past barrels through the Ivy League, London high finance, and spy-haunted Afghanistan in a page-turning tale of exile, intrigue and the price of friendship. A Discover Great New Writers selection.

The People's Platform

Once touted as the foundation for tomorrow's digital democracy, the Internet is increasingly ruled by a few corporate giants, while millions of contributors till its fields for free. Astra Taylor looks at why the web has failed to deliver a communitarian cyberscape, and offers a compelling case for restoring its original vision.

A Private Venus

Dubbed "the Italian Simenon," Giorgio Scerbanenco (1911-1969) began his crime-writing career with books set in the USA, but quickly shifted scene closer to home, the city of Milan.  In this adventure, appearing in English for the first time, his underdog hero Dr. Duca Lamberti finds himself in the middle of a seedy, scantily clad criminal racket, where the presence of an outsider could result in death.