Displaying articles for: July 2013

BNR Recommends: 10 Great International Noirs

For many of us, summer reading means the chance to experience exotic locales beyond those frequent-flier miles can reach-- or to indulge in a safely imaginary excursion to the shadowy sides of human experience.  Why not combine the two?  Crime noir from around the world is perfectly suited for the season's sweltering days and nights. Here are ten tales of international intrigue have captured our attention:  whether they accompany you to the beach, on a flight, or even on a late-night stakeout, these cold-blooded tales are just the thing for the journey through a long, hot August.

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Phallos

The first edition of Samuel Delany's novella Phallos was published by a small press in 2004. Nowadays, it's a sought-after rarity among Delany fanatics. Although I own all of Delany's other books, I have never lucked into a copy myself. But now, thanks to the editorial acumen and good taste of Wesleyan University Press (buttressed by several accessibly scholarly essays attached), an affordable new edition is available. Moreover, the text is enhanced and expanded by one-third. Delany fans, rejoice!

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April 19: "What you see first, after the starting gun's crack, is a column of bobbing runners, thousands of them, surging downhill..."

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.