Displaying articles for: April 2010

The Loneliest Job in the World

We concluded a month of verse celebrating National Poetry Month with Tony Hoagland's "The Loneliest Job in the World", from Unincorporated Persons in the Late Honda Dynasty. Read more...

"My vain self-complacency rides high"

Twain's last big trip -- and hurrah -- was to Oxford University in the summer of 1907 to receive an Honorary Doctorate, which he esteemed as "the highest honor that has ever fallen to my share of this life's prizes." His final public address before sailing for home was his "Begum of Bengal" speech, now regarded as one of his best. Read more in the second installment of our Twain: Milestones series.

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"Of the Parrat and other birds that can speake"

The penultimate poem in our celebration of National Poetry Month is from Nick Lantz's book, We Don't Know We Don't Know, published by Graywolf Press. Read more...

Miss Peach: The War Years

Today's entry in our month-long celebration of National Poetry Month is by Catie Rosemurgy, from her book The Stranger Manual, recently published by Graywolf. Read more...

Railroad Train, 1908

We continue celebrating National Poetry Month, and Graywolf Press, with verse by the Catalan poet Ernest Farrés, translated by Lawrence Venuti, from the volume Edward Hopper. Read more...

I As In Justice

We continue our celebration of National Poetry Month with a poem a day from work recently issued by Graywolf. First up is "I As In Justice," by Mary Jo Bang. Read more...

The Rage

We celebrate National Poetry Month with a selection of poems from City Lights Books. Today: "The Rage," by Pier Paolo Pasolini. Read more...

Meeting With My Father In The Orchard

We celebrate National Poetry Month with a selection of poems from City Lights Books. Today: "Meeting With My Father In The Orchard," by Homero Aridjis. Read more...

“Heaven for climate, and hell for society”

Our feeling for Mark Twain is as his for the Mississippi River — a book that cannot be thrown aside. And if its life-stories are shifting or not now full of their intended wonder, they are also enduring. In this first installment of the B&N “Milestone” series, we will follow the arc of Twain’s life backwards, from his April 21, 1910 death to his November 30, 1835 birth. Seven-and-a-half decades covered on these pages over the next seven-and-a-half months — making the same sort of allowances Twain made when claiming that his birth (twenty days late) and his death (one day late) coincided with the appearance of Haley’s Comet. Read more...

The Rising of the Ashes

We celebrate National Poetry Month with a selection of poems from City Lights Books. Today: excerpts from "The Rising of the Ashes," by Tahar Ben Jelloun. Read more...

The Sacred Couple

We celebrate National Poetry Month with a selection of poems from City Lights Books. Today: "The Sacred Couple" by Homero Aridjis. Read more...

Spine To Spin, Spoke To Speak

We celebrate National Poetry Month with a selection of poems from the publisher City Lights Books. First, from Andrew Joron, Trance Archive: New & Selected Poems, "Spine To Spin, Spoke To Speak." Read more...

Waving Goodbye

We celebrate National Poetry Month with a selection of poems from the publisher David R. Godine. Today: Wesley McNair's "Waving Goodbye." Read more...

Bare Almond Trees

We celebrate National Poetry Month with a selection of poems from the publisher David R. Godine. Today: D. H. Lawrence's "Bare Almond Trees." Read more...

Beginning

We celebrate National Poetry Month with a selection of poems from the publisher David R. Godine. Today: "The Beginning," by Linda Bamber. Read more...

Spring Songs

We celebrate National Poetry Month with a selection of poems from the publisher David R. Godine. Today: "Spring Songs," by Rainer Maria Rilke. Read more...

All Possibilities

We celebrate National Poetry Month with a selection of poems from the publisher David R. Godine. First up: Andrew Motion's "All Possibilities." Read more...

A Poem by Ange Mlinko

Coffee House Press helps us celebrate National Poetry Month. Read Ange Mlinko's "Treatment." Read more...

What the Stars Will Bring

Our celebration of National Poetry Month continues with Greg Hewett's "What the Stars Will Bring." Read more...

A Poem by Mark McMorris

Our celebration of National Poetry Month continues with Mark McMorris's "Letters to Micheal." Read more...

A Poem by Lightsey Darst

Our celebration of National Poetry Month continues with Lightsey Darst 's "Billboard." Read more...

"Corporate Abstraction"

Our celebration of National Poetry Month continues with Ange Mlinko's "Corporate Abstraction." Read more...

April 19: "What you see first, after the starting gun's crack, is a column of bobbing runners, thousands of them, surging downhill..."

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.