Displaying articles for: October 2013

Discover Authors and the 2013 Whiting Writers Awards

Few things better in the world than watching a writer receive an award, if you ask me.  Last night in New York, the Whiting Writers Awards were presented, and among the 10 recipients were three Discover writers: C.E. Morgan (2009, shortlisted for the Discover Award -fiction), Amanda Coplin (2012, winner of the Discover Award - fiction), and Jennifer Dubois (2013).  Jennifer discusses the inspiration for the new novel; challenging her characters’ -- and readers’ – preconceptions, (mis)interpretations, and snap judgments; and a list of the books she’s been reading lately with Discover Great New Writers.

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Alice Munro, Nobel Laureate

"In my own house, I seemed to be often looking for a place to hide—sometimes from the children but more often from the jobs to be done and the phone ringing and the sociability of the neighborhood. I wanted to hide so that I could get busy at my real work, which was a sort of wooing of distant parts of myself." That’s the unmistakable voice of Alice Munro, who has just been awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.

 

We congratulate the Swedish Academy on its very good taste. If you’ve never read Munro's work, you’ll find the story I’ve quoted ("Miles City, Montana") and other splendid works here.

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Cracking Hard Case Crime

After its brief hiatus some years ago, the Hard Case Crime imprint has bounced back better and bigger than ever.

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April 19: "What you see first, after the starting gun's crack, is a column of bobbing runners, thousands of them, surging downhill..."

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.