Welcome

Welcome to the new Barnes & Noble Review. We’re glad to celebrate our second anniversary with a refreshed design and a number of added functions and features.  For a start, our new homepage allows us to display more links to the rich array of good writing supplied by our reviewers, columnists, and other contributors.

In addition, you can now search the Review’s content and, once you sign in with your Barnes & Noble user name and password, comment upon what you read here. We look forward to hearing from you.

Two new features debut today as well: Daybook, written by our Newfoundland correspondent Steve King, offers a learned and witty daily dose of literary history, while In the Margin, the blog you’re reading now, will provide a forum for the Review’s editors (that would be me and Managing Editor Bill Tipper) and friends to comment on bookish business and other matters.

Next week, we’ll launch a special blog devoted to the National Book Foundation’s Best of the National Book Award Fiction contest. And very soon, Sarah Weinman will be joining our regular columnists -- Brooke Allen, Paul DiFilippo, Michael Dirda, A. C. Grayling, Eloisa James, and Ward Sutton -- with a mystery feature called The Criminalist.

Of course, we have a marvelous set of daily reviews lined up through the Fall, beginning with today’s fine appreciation, by Pete Hamill, of E. L. Doctorow’s new novel. We hope you’ll check in every day, subscribe to our RSS feed, and, when the spirit moves you, sign in and tell us what you think.

-James Mustich, Editor-in-Chief

Comments
by Cheryl_J on ‎09-14-2009 05:35 AM

Wow - This  is GREAT!

by Gothenberg on ‎09-14-2009 06:12 AM

Nice  - I like what you have done with the place.  Congrats!

April 24: "[The HST] lifted a curtain from our view of the universe, changing it so profoundly that no human can look at the stars in the same way..."

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