The BN Review on Pulse for NOOK

Now you can read the Barnes & Noble Review on your NOOK with the free Pulse app. Take good reading and good writing with you wherever you go.

 

Download the Pulse app (click here for NOOK version) to select from a wide assortment of news and entertainment categories.  You can group them according to your tastes, and read anywhere, anytime through Pulse's image-rich, dynamic interface.  The Barnes & Noble Review looks as great when viewed through Pulse as it does on the web -- and as all of our reviews, essays and features are posted there, you won't miss a thing. (Here's a shot of what Pulse looks like in action.)

 

To get the BN Review on Pulse, once you've downloaded the free app to your device, you can add sources  -- look for the Review under the "Entertainment" category.  Once you've added us to your home screen, that's it.  Your device will automatically update, bringing you the latest from the Barnes & Noble Review. Pulse works great on iPad, iPhone, and Android-based phones, too (click here for these versions of the app)

 

And thanks, as always, for reading.

April 21: " 'Pull' includes 'invitations to tea' at which one hears smiling reminders that a better life is available to people who stop talking about massacres..."

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