A Child's Fan Letter

Lee Child's essay on an episode from his life as a reader and writer comes from a marvelous collection of exclusive essays from bestselling authors compiled by our colleagues at the Nook blog Unbound. Click here to read them all.

 

Lee Child

They say the past is another country, and in my case it really was: provincial England at the end of the fifties and the start of the sixties, the last gasp of the post-war era, before it surrendered to the tectonic shift sparked by the Beatles.  My family was neither rich nor poor, not that either condition had much meaning in a society with not much to buy and not much to lack.  We accumulated toys at the rate of two a year: one on our birthdays, and one at Christmas.  We had a big table radio (which we called "the wireless") in the dining room, and in the living room we had a black and white fishbowl television, full of glowing tubes, but there were only two channels, and they went off the air at ten in the evening, after playing the National Anthem, for which some families stood up, and sometimes we saw a double bill at the pictures on a Saturday morning, but apart from that we had no entertainment.

 

So we read books.  As it happens I just saw some old research from that era which broke down reading habits by class (as so much was categorized in England at that time) and which showed that fully fifty percent of the middle class regarded reading as their main leisure activity.  The figure for skilled workers was twenty-five percent, and even among laborers ten percent turned to books as a primary choice.

 

Not that we bought them.  We used the library.  Ours was housed in a leftover WW2 Nissen hut (the British version of a Quonset hut) which sat on a bombed-out lot behind a church.  It had a low door and a unique warm, musty, dusty smell, which I think came partly from the worn floorboards and partly from the books themselves, of which there were not very many.  I finished with the children's picture books by the time I was four, and had read all the chapter books by the time I was eight, and had read all the grown-up books by the time I was ten.

 

Not that I was unique - or even very bookish.  I was one of the rough kids.  We fought and stole and broke windows and walked miles to soccer games, where we fought some more.  We were covered in scabs and scars.  We had knives in our pockets - but we had books in our pockets too.  Even the kids who couldn't read tried very hard to, because we all sensed there was more to life than the gray, pinched, post-war horizons seemed to offer.  Traveling farther than we could walk in half a day was out of the question - but we could travel in our heads ... to Australia, Africa, America ... by sea, by air, on horseback, in helicopters, in submarines.  Meeting people unlike ourselves was very rare ... but we could meet them on the page.  For most of us, reading - and imagining, and dreaming - was as useful as breathing.

 

My parents were decent, dutiful people, and when my mother realized I had read everything the Nissen hut had to offer - most of it twice - she got me a library card for a bigger place the other side of the canal.  I would head over there on a Friday afternoon after school and load up with the maximum allowed - six titles - which would make life bearable and get me through the week.  Just.  Which sounds ungrateful - my parents were doing their best, no question, but lively, energetic kids needed more than that time and place could offer.  Once a year we went and spent a week in a trailer near the sea - no better or worse a vacation than anyone else got, for sure, but usually accompanied by lashing rain and biting cold and absolutely nothing to do.

 

The only thing that got me through one such week was Von Ryan's Express by David Westheimer.  I loved that book.  It was a WW2 prisoner-of-war story full of tension and suspense and twists and turns, but its biggest "reveal" was moral rather than physical - what at first looked like collaboration with the enemy turned out to be resistance and escape.  I read it over and over that week and never forgot it.

 

Then almost forty years later, when my own writing career was picking up a head of steam, I got a fan letter signed by a David Westheimer.  The handwriting was shaky, as if the guy was old.  I wondered, could it be?  I wrote back and asked, are you the David Westheimer?  Turned out yes, it was.  We started a correspondence that lasted until he died.  I met him in person at a book signing I did in California, near his home, which gave me a chance to tell him how he had kept me sane in a rain-lashed trailer all those years ago.  He said he had had the same kind of experience forty years before that.  Now I look forward to writing a fan letter to a new author years from now ... and maybe hearing my books had once meant something special to him or her.  Because that's what books do - they dig deeper, they mean more, they stick around forever.

 

Lee Child is the author of fifteen Jack Reacher thrillers, including the #1 bestsellers Worth Dying For, 61 Hours, Gone Tomorrow, Bad Luck and Trouble, and Nothing to Lose. His debut, Killing Floor , won both the Anthony and the Barry awards for Best First Mystery, and The Enemy won both the Barry and Neroawards for Best Novel. His novels are published in 78 countries and 38 languages worldwide. All titles have been optioned for major motion pictures. A native of England and a former television director, Child lives in New York City.  His next novel, The Affair, will publish in September 2011.

Comments
by sarla on ‎07-15-2011 01:51 PM

This post touched my heart. I am not an author but do appreciate the sentiment. I'm thinking Mr. Child has more than one young author whom he is keeping sane. I enjoy his work and enjoyed this post.  Thank you.

July 22: On this day in 1941, on his twelfth wedding anniversary, Eugene O'Neill presented the just-finished manuscript of Long Day's Journey into Night to his wife, Carlotta.

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