Displaying articles for: December 2009

Sinister Yogis

A history of yoga leads to a history of yogis -- and finds something far more colorful than a lineage of meditation and enlightenment. Read more...

The Golden Age of Television

A new collection brings together the best of the American teleplays of the 1950s, when the tube was alight with compelling drama. Read more...

How to Roast a Lamb

A sophisticated take on classics of Greek cuisine, from the chef-owner of the celebrated restaurant Anthos. Read more...

Liver

A quartet of novellas that draw inspiration from a vital but mysterious organ. Read more...

Tom Jobim: Brazil’s Ambassador of Song

The Brazilian master of the bossa nova is the subject of a multipart video portrait that tracks him from his Rio roots to global fame. Read more...

The Gift of Thanks

Circles of giving, across centuries and continents. Read more...

Objectified

In an age of disposable mass-production, a celebration of beauty in the aesthetics of everything from the toothpick to the iPhone. Read more...

The Pleasures of Cooking for One

A cookbook for when dinner doesn't require a party. Read more...

Stories in Stone

The geological secrets quietly immured in the walls of cottages and cathedrals. Read more...

The Dead

John Huston's directorial swan song glories in its sensitivity to its source in James Joyce's haunting story. Read more...

Knives at Dawn

Annals of the Bocuse d'Or -- the "culinary Olympics" that pit the world's most proficient chefs against one another. Read more...

Death in the Garden

Luis Buñuel’s drama of survival and betrayed ideals shows the range of the director's filmmaking mastery. Read more...

News of the World

Poems that evoke the dynamism and variety of midcentury America -- and elsewhere.

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25,000 Years of Erotic Freedom

The comics legend and creator of Watchmen makes a case for the cultural importance of sex in art. Read more...

Unpacking My Library

Architects uncover the foundations of their thinking in this revealing look at how they build their book collections. Read more...

Pops: A Life of Louis Armstrong

Terry Teachout's new biography of the jazz patriarch evokes memories of indelible moments in listening. Read more...

The Age of Empathy

A primatologist makes the case for the origin of our softest traits in the toughest challenges of survival. Read more...

Gomorra

A journalist's expose of Neapolitan organized crime is transformed into a cinematic portrayal of corrosive violence. Read more...

Logos

Bradford Cox's new record explores the splendors and sorrows of isolation. Read more...

April 18: "[W]ould it be too bold to imagine that all warm-blooded animals have arisen from one living filament…?"

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.