Displaying articles for: October 2009

Mr. Jefferson and the Giant Moose

How a seven-foot skeleton found its way from Monticello to a French naturalist's collection -- and what it told Europe about America. Read more...

Return to the Hundred Acre Wood

Christopher Robin's gentle coterie makes an encore appearance in this revisitation of A. A. Milne's beloved characters. Read more...

Z.

A thriller as effective in its stylish satire as it is transparent in its political sympathies. Read more...

The New Black

A psychoanalyst's call to think of "depression" as a factor of experience -- not illness. Read more...

Anne Frank: The Book, the Life, the Afterlife

Looking past the icon to find the writer. Read more...

Save the Deli

Will the pastrami on rye go the way of the dodo? Read more...

Heidegger and a Hippo Walk Through Those Pearly Gates

The authors of Plato and a Platypus Walk into a Bar return with some deadly jesting. Read more...

Starting Point: 1979-1996

A new collection of essays by and interviews with famed anime creator Hayao Miyazaki. Read more...

A Fine Romance

A case for the distinctively Jewish aspect of the American Songbook. Read more...

Masterpiece Comics

A hilarious -- and literarily astute -- mashup of literary monuments with the styles of cartoonists ranging from Windsor McKay to Charles Schulz. Read more...

Civil War Wives

A southern abolitionist, a general's spouse, and the first lady of the Confederacy. Read more...

The Book Shopper

A life among the leaves. Read more...

My Guilty Pleasure

The followup disc from the pop chanteuse of Disco Romance returns to dance clubs past. Read more...

Boilerplate: History's Mechanical Marvel

An illustrated history of the feats of an armor-plated hero. Read more...

Risk

A professionally suspicious married couple get caught up in the mysterious death of a rich woman's son. Read more...

April 19: "What you see first, after the starting gun's crack, is a column of bobbing runners, thousands of them, surging downhill..."

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

advertisement
Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.