Krazy & Ignatz: The Kat Who Walked in Beauty

Even ardent experts in the cartoon science of Herrimanology will find revelations to amaze and astonish in The Kat Who Walked in Beauty. Did you know, for instance, that Krazy's daily beaning was karmic repayment for the wanton slaughter waged by feline ancestors? Under the intelligent aegis of editor Derya Ataker, this luxe volume collects for the first time the "panoramic" Krazy Kat strips from 1920 and 1921. Bookending these gems are, up front, the earliest 1911 appearances of Krazy and his/her brick-tossing nemesis, Ignatz; and, at rear, the program book from the 1922 jazz ballet inspired by K&I.

Herriman's nimble and surreal vaudeville show plays as brightly today as it did a century ago, influencing such artists as Patrick McDonnell, Tony Millionaire, Bill Watterson, Robert Crumb, and Jim Woodring. To quote Krazy: "I could look on thou forever in reptcha."
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April 18: "[W]ould it be too bold to imagine that all warm-blooded animals have arisen from one living filament…?"

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

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Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.