Jon Meacham

The author of Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power recommends books that illuminate American history.

 

 

Jon Meacham's Pultizer Prize-winning biography, American Lion, delivered an engrossing account of one of our most influential, controversial, and intriguing presidents, Andrew Jackson. Now in Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power, Meacham fixes his sights on a contradictory Founding Father who, though equal parts brilliant and flawed, was most importantly a savvy manipulator of popular opinion and political power.

 

Books by Jon Meacham

 


 

The Wise Men

By Walter Isaacson and Evan Thomas

 

"Wonderful group biography that makes an irrefutable case about the primacy of human agency in history."

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

The Glory and the Dream

By William Manchester

 

"The making of America from the Bonus March to Nixon's 1972 landslide. Vivid, brilliant."

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

The Age of Jackson

By Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.

 

"Schlesinger couldn't write a bad sentence. This is intellectual and political history at its finest."

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Walking with the Wind

By John Lewis and Michael D'Orso

 

"The memoir of perhaps the bravest American of our time, from his preaching to chickens on the farm to the March on Washington to Selma."

 

 

 

 

 


 

The Resurrection of the Son of God

By N. T. Wright

 

"A lucid, comprehensive history of the idea (and, for Christians, the reality) of resurrection."

April 17: "In less than three years, both GM and Chrysler would be bankrupt, and a resurgent Ford would wow Wall Street..."

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.