Emily Giffin

Novels and stories that make permanent imprints on the heart.

 

 

While working as an attorney in Manhattan, aspiring novelist Emily Giffin first tried her hand at fiction with a book for young adults; after she moved to London, and penned the more grown-up tale Something Borrowed, she found herself a bestselling author, garnering both critical praise and popular acclaim for her stories of romance, parenthood, and modern life have: her latest, Heart of the Matter, will be published next week.   Emily Giffin shared three of her favorite books with the Barnes & Noble Review.

 

Books by Emily Giffin

 

 


 

The Member of the Wedding

By Carson McCullers

 

"I think the timing of when you read a book plays into your love for it. If I read this book later in life, I'm not sure it would have become a favorite. But I was in the eighth grade when I immersed myself in the quiet angst of this coming-of-age story. I loved twelve-year-old Frankie for so many reasons, but mostly because she made me feel less lonely -- as if I weren't the only one who wished to be a part of something larger."

 

 

 


 

The Inn at Lake Devine

By Elinor Lipman

 

"Sometimes it's hard to pinpoint exactly why you fall in love with a book or movie -- or a person, for that matter -- but I adore this little gem of a romantic comedy about a segregated inn in Vermont. It is satisfying, sweet, and wise – and, like all of Lipman's books, utterly original. She is so brilliant at creating witty dialogue and vivid characters, and has been a great inspiration to me as a writer, especially when I was finding the courage to leave my career as an attorney. I so admire her straightforward, authentic storytelling, and can always count on her for a happy ending."

 

 


 

Runaway

By Alice Munro

 

"As far as I'm concerned, Alice Munro is the best writer alive today (and better than most of the famous dead ones too!) and this is her most superb collection of stories. I marvel at her ability to instill the deepest empathy for her characters and depict betrayal, love, and friendship seemingly so effortlessly. My favorite in this collection is "Tricks" -- a haunting story about a woman who, through odd happenstance, finds and then loses the love of her life. I don't need intricate plot twists to love a book or story -- yet I never saw this surprise coming."

 

April 19: "What you see first, after the starting gun's crack, is a column of bobbing runners, thousands of them, surging downhill..."

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

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Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

And women too.  Luminaries from Colin Firth to Nick Cave and Jonathan Franzen chose the poems that bring them to tears, and the result is a stunning collection of poignant verse from writers like Auden, Whitman, Bishop, Larkin, Neruda and many others.  Warning: choking-up hazard.

The King of Pain

Trapped beneath his entertainment system, reality TV mastermind Rick Salter reflects on his life and tries to piece together the events of the previous evening. Seth Kaufman’s romp is an outrageous meditation on pain and entertainment in a deranged world in which the two are often interchangeable.

The Good Inn

Frank Black, frontman for the Pixies, has written a transgressive historical fiction with shades of Thomas Pynchon (focused as it is on the history of explosives and cinematic pornography), all set in a hallucinatory Edwardian Europe.