Charlaine Harris

 

The creator of the Southern Vampire series shares three books to sink your teeth into.

 

 

Elin Hilderbrand Charlaine Harris brought a dose of Southern Gothic atmosphere to vampire fiction when she created Sookie Stackhouse, the telepathic heroine of Dead Until Dark. Now that her novels have been adapted as the HBO series True Blood, a host of new readers are meeting Sookie for the first time. The author shares three books that spark her unique imagination.

 

Books by Charlaine Harris

 

 

 

 


 

Melusine

By Sarah Monette

 

"Sarah Monette's debut novel is a richly imagined world with a dark, delicate, and complex plot. Each character is fully realized, and the language is as shaded as the emotional palette. I know, I know; this book makes me wax pretentious."

 

 

 

 

 


 

World War Z

By Max Brooks

 

"The choices Brooks made in this book fascinate me. The different voices he uses are incredibly convincing and the mythology behind the narrative is flawless."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

A Dangerous Man

By Charlie Huston

 

"This is the third book in Huston's Henry Thompason trilogy, and it's the only book that ever made me cry in an airport. Huston is ruthless and courageous in his plotting of the continuing misadventures of Hank Thompson, which began in the almost equally wonderful Caught Stealing."

 

April 19: "What you see first, after the starting gun's crack, is a column of bobbing runners, thousands of them, surging downhill..."

Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch is the winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. James Parker calls this Dickensian coming-of-age novel "an enveloping…

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