Charlaine Harris

 

The creator of the Southern Vampire series shares three books to sink your teeth into.

 

 

Elin Hilderbrand Charlaine Harris brought a dose of Southern Gothic atmosphere to vampire fiction when she created Sookie Stackhouse, the telepathic heroine of Dead Until Dark. Now that her novels have been adapted as the HBO series True Blood, a host of new readers are meeting Sookie for the first time. The author shares three books that spark her unique imagination.

 

Books by Charlaine Harris

 

 

 

 


 

Melusine

By Sarah Monette

 

"Sarah Monette's debut novel is a richly imagined world with a dark, delicate, and complex plot. Each character is fully realized, and the language is as shaded as the emotional palette. I know, I know; this book makes me wax pretentious."

 

 

 

 

 


 

World War Z

By Max Brooks

 

"The choices Brooks made in this book fascinate me. The different voices he uses are incredibly convincing and the mythology behind the narrative is flawless."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

A Dangerous Man

By Charlie Huston

 

"This is the third book in Huston's Henry Thompason trilogy, and it's the only book that ever made me cry in an airport. Huston is ruthless and courageous in his plotting of the continuing misadventures of Hank Thompson, which began in the almost equally wonderful Caught Stealing."

 

April 23: " 'A job,' the woman repeated again, smiling, as if I hadn't heard her. 'Would you like one?' "

Kenneth Calhoun (Black Moon) and Lysley Tenorio (Monstress) of the Discover Great New Writers program on B-movies, heritage, and finales.

advertisement
Books, CDs, DVDs to know about now
In the Light of What We Know

Zia Haider Rahman's mystery of a brilliant Bangledeshi mathematician and the haunting crime he's committed barrels through the Ivy League, London high finance, and ravaged Afghanistan with vinegar-steeped prose recalling the best of George Orwell and Joseph Conrad.

The People's Platform

Why is the Internet - once touted as the democratizer of the future - ruled by a few corporate giants, while countless aspirants work for free? Astra Taylor diagnoses why the web has failed to be a utopian playing field, and offers compelling ways we can diversify the marketplace and give voice to the marginalized.

A Private Venus

Dubbed "the Italian Simenon," Giorgio Scerbanenco (1911-1969) began his crime-writing career with books set in the USA, but quickly shifted scene closer to home, the city of Milan.  In this adventure, appearing in English for the first time, his underdog hero Dr. Duca Lamberti finds himself in the middle of a seedy, scantily clad criminal racket, where the presence of an outsider could result in death.